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Space Question

Posted by: asus6983 - Wed Jun 01, 2011 9:48 pm
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Post Space Question   Posted on: Wed Jun 01, 2011 9:48 pm
Would it be possible to go from first orbit to a man on the moon in 9 years in todays climate? Please elaborate as much as possible.


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Post Re: Space Question   Posted on: Mon Jun 06, 2011 3:40 am
Yeah, it hasn't gotten much warmer, it wouldn't reduce the strength of the rockets by a significant amount.


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Post Re: Space Question   Posted on: Mon Jun 06, 2011 12:18 pm
asus6983 wrote:
Would it be possible to go from first orbit to a man on the moon in 9 years in todays climate? Please elaborate as much as possible.


I have my doubts politically or economical but technologically i think it would be easier to do as in less than 9 years if there was the political will to throw the resources needed to do it give me a $Billion and i will have a go. :wink: :twisted:

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Post Re: Space Question   Posted on: Mon Jun 06, 2011 8:15 pm
Elon's almost spent $1B and he'll need at least $1B more to land on the moon... that being said, he wouldn't need much more than that to do it, I don't think.

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Post Re: Space Question   Posted on: Wed Jun 08, 2011 8:52 pm
Is this a homework question? It's phrased that way, but I'm not sure what school would ask that particular question, so I'll assume that it isn't. As a general thing though, remember everyone who's currently in some kind of school, that the point of education is to make you practice things, so that when you need to do them for real, you can. There will always be an Internet that has semi-relevant stuff on it, but you will only very rarely find an answer to your exact question that applies to your exact situation. If you want to make yourself useful enough later to keep your job and be able to feed your family, you'd better practice now...

Anyway, back to space. Considering how the US spent several trillion dollars on wars in the past decade, despite not exactly being in a good financial state to begin with, it's not impossible. You need a pretty strong trigger though. For the Iraq and Afghanistan wars, that was 9/11, which was an incredibly strong trigger (strong enough to trigger a war in a completely unrelated country even). In the 1960's space race, it was the launch of Sputnik in the context of the Cold War.

Today, it could be the Chinese space efforts. So far what they've done hasn't been very spectacular compared to the awesome technological achievement of the Space Shuttle, but if the Chinese start exploring beyond low earth orbit, it may trigger a 'Hey, aren't we supposed to be the greatest nation in space exploration?' moment in the US. We saw that a little bit when the Chinese downed a satellite, and the US felt it necessary to shoot down a satellite of their own, just to show that they could. Historically, there's been a very strong negative correlation between the strength of economic ties between countries and the chance of a war between them, so given how much the Chinese and US economies are linked, a shooting war seems unlikely. Another Space Race might be an alternative and relatively harmless way of stroking the national egos. Considering the current state of the US economy however, especially relative to the Chinese economic situation, one has to wonder whether that will end like the Cold War did.

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Post Re: Space Question   Posted on: Fri Jul 15, 2011 6:42 am
I saw this news that tackles about Chinese Space Program. In the news they have mentioned that China has announced plans for a brand-new space launch. The space shuttle plan has been grounded in the United States, and several fear the loss of our prominence in space. China’s space program also seems to have all the funding and resources it needs, partially due to the fact that seven of China’s nine most senior leaders. Here is the proof: Chinese space program blasts off as U.S. frizzles


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Post Re: Space Question   Posted on: Thu Jul 28, 2011 2:15 am
This question is actually several implicit questions:

1. Is it physically possible to go from first orbit to a man on the Moon in 9 years in today's economy?

Yes. There are no inherent physical barriers that were not present in the 1960s.

2. Is it technologically possible?

Yes. All aspects of rocketry, communications, computation, and environmental control are more advanced today than when the original moon landings occurred.

3. Is it economically / politically feasible?

In the public sector, no. Public appropriations for space has become a quagmire, where the diminishing amount of money which does get through is almost always toward expensive, inefficient purposes (e.g., developing entirely new rockets when existing ones are sufficient) with no intention of realizing an exploration objective.

In the private sector, however, the answer is maybe. It would depend on the amount of money invested in the project. It would have to focus primarily on developing the spacecraft, landers, and surface habitats, and rely on existing commercial rocketry from other companies. A mere stunt with minimal future replicability could be done far more easily than one that built up an infrastructure along the way, but there is no point in that. I do not expect a manned moon landing in 9 years - but at the same time I would not be too shocked if it happened.

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Post Re: Space Question   Posted on: Thu Jul 28, 2011 8:08 am
Troubadour wrote:
In the private sector, however, the answer is maybe. It would depend on the amount of money invested in the project. It would have to focus primarily on developing the spacecraft, landers, and surface habitats, and rely on existing commercial rocketry from other companies. A mere stunt with minimal future replicability could be done far more easily than one that built up an infrastructure along the way, but there is no point in that. I do not expect a manned moon landing in 9 years - but at the same time I would not be too shocked if it happened.


I wouldn't be surprised if Musk dropped something on the moon in the next 9 years - but unlikely to be manned I think. Maybe a Dragon with the landing rockets. Or perhaps Armadillo might do something if they can hitch a ride, but that's very unlikely.


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Post Re: Space Question   Posted on: Wed Aug 10, 2011 2:40 am
Doesn't even have to be dropped on the moon. In an earlier thread there was a scheme for a lunar orbit insertion of a manned Dragon with two Falcon-9 launches.

You ought to be able to find 3 multi-millionaires somewhere in the world who want a trip 'round the Moon.


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Post Re: Space Question   Posted on: Sun Feb 16, 2014 10:05 pm
Right JamesG..if anyone can assure you have a craft that can take let's say 4 visitors to moon safely and let them swing the golf club there and take few photos with less than 40 million you would have a go. There are people than can buy 100 000 000 usd flats too.

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Post Re: Space Question   Posted on: Mon Feb 17, 2014 2:07 am
Fools and their money...

You've revived a bunch of dead threads. Bored today?


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Post Re: Space Question   Posted on: Mon Feb 17, 2014 8:25 am
JamesG..yes I wanted a bit conversation.

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Post Re: Space Question   Posted on: Fri Apr 18, 2014 8:15 pm
asus6983 wrote:
Would it be possible to go from first orbit to a man on the moon in 9 years in todays climate? Please elaborate as much as possible.


Technologically, yes. In fact, it's far easier today than it was when it originally happened, for many reasons: Far superior technology in every field, awareness that it can be done at all, decades of experience with humans in space, safer and more reliable rocketry, and a better understanding of the Moon.

Politically and economically, less so. There are not the same political, ideological, and industrial imperatives backing such a drive, and it remains very expensive because of the lack of progress in lowering launch costs. SpaceX is beginning to make progress on that front, but it will be a few years before they've brought costs down far enough that governments will seriously consider going back to the moon with people.

The main technical obstacle is the landing. Orbiting the moon is easy and is just an extension of orbiting Earth, but landing poses major difficulties. That's why the Chinese are excited by the success of their robotic lander/rover Yutu - it builds a technical foundation for landers in general that could be extended to manned landings. But the US isn't slouching - SpaceX's Grasshopper and F-9R testbed rockets practice VTVL launches, and their lessons would be applicable to planetary landers. Ditto the development of SuperDraco landing thrusters for the crewed Dragon 2.

Without needing any sort of grandiose political initiative, I think it's a reasonable bet that humans will be back on the moon before the end of this decade, because I think the ability to go back will be created by SpaceX before the end of the decade and people will use it.


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Post Re: Space Question   Posted on: Wed Apr 23, 2014 5:44 pm
I think that going to the moon , unless you plan on building a station there is folly,

I think a reusable electric launch (however achieved) is the only way forward,

we need to be able to launch 100 ships a week, with solar, or wind or???

but not rocket fuel.

I am a fan of beamed power,

I was thinking ship makes plasma,

Earth based antennas, focuses EMF on plasma, supplying power, but I don't have the details worked out yet.

someone care to speculate how this could be done?

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