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"Technology" for high pressure atmospheres?

Posted by: Ekkehard Augustin - Mon Nov 01, 2004 1:45 pm
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"Technology" for high pressure atmospheres? 
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Post "Technology" for high pressure atmospheres?   Posted on: Mon Nov 01, 2004 1:45 pm
The capsule that entered the jovian atmosphere a few years ago has collapsed due to very high pressure in regions around 1000 km to 2000 km beneath the highest regions of that atmosphere.

Since then I sometimes think of possibilities to prevent such collapses - so is it possible to let the jovian atmosphere float into such an capsule to increase the pressure inside?

Can that be done without hurting radio and scientific instruments? Let's keep aside reentry velocity first for a while. The question could be interesting at Titan and Venus too.



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Post    Posted on: Tue Nov 02, 2004 4:50 pm
Actually the probe failed due to high temperature (153 C) at a depth of 146 KM. Here is a link:
<http://spaceprojects.arc.nasa.gov/Space_Projects/galileo_probe/htmls/Probe_Mission.html>
And the Venus landers failed due to even higher temperatures. So the problem is not pressure, it is high temperatures.


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Post    Posted on: Wed Nov 03, 2004 11:34 am
The problem concerning temperatures might be solved perhaps too - that is an interesting topic too.

Assumed the temperature problem is solved - the pressure would have destroyed the capsule short time later. The venusian temperature is due to the very long rotation period of the venusian body as well as to the closer distance to sun. Partly the temperature there is due to pressure...



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Post    Posted on: Wed Nov 03, 2004 2:38 pm
Probably the pressure is no problem. I very much doubt the Venus or Jupiter probes were airtight. They probably let in the outside pressure just as you propose, although I don't know that for sure. Certainly we have made deep sea vehicles that can stand much higher pressures than were experienced by any spacecraft yet.

I am less optimistic about the temperature problem. Electronics are especially temperature sensitive. That is why air conditioning is so important in computer rooms.


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Post    Posted on: Wed Nov 03, 2004 3:24 pm
I allways return to think of recent successes in cretaing torpedos moving in a bubble. These torpedos do have so much speed that they don't touch the water they are surrounded by.

Perhaps this is possible in this atmospheres too. If there is no touch the temperature problem should be reduced I speculate. Next if the vehicle is moving supersonic the atmosphere would float adiabatic around it - as far as I know this is preventing interchange of heat between the gases and the vehicle.

So perhaps there might be velocities at which the temperature of some lower regions of the jovian atmosphere would effect the vehicle. If the velocity is less magnetic cooling, thick walls etc. might be interesting.

I might be completely wrong - but it might be interesting to search for hidden solutions.



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Post    Posted on: Wed Apr 01, 2009 8:15 pm
Might "Wurtzit-Bornitrid" or Lonsdaleite be of interest for entering very dense atmospheres? According to an article under www.wissenschaft.de referring to www.newscientist.com/article/dn16610-di ... erial.html says the first is harder than diamond by 18% and the second is harder than diamond by 58%.

So theymight resist to the jovian as well as to the venusian pressure...



What about it?



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