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Gravity as a tool

Posted by: Ekkehard Augustin - Thu Nov 10, 2005 12:54 pm
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Gravity as a tool 
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Space Station Commander
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Post    Posted on: Wed Nov 16, 2005 6:28 pm
There was no attack of any kind. An astronaut is not a vehicle designer. Griffin is. To point that out is not an attack of any kind.

How would Griffin feel if an astronaut undermined him and agreed with a system proposed by astronomers who might like to gut VSE just to put an underpowered JIMO type craft in space?

Ed hasn't gone that far yet--but that doesn't mean it won't happen. Griffin and launch vehicle advocates inside the industry and out have been subjected to all kinds of abuse for questioning how it is that payloads have been giving more importance than rockets.

Bill Eoff, who proposed Magnum a decade or so ago left Marshall in disgust when Dennis Smith, Dan Dumbacher and others here came up with X-33, and the SLI make-work programs. I just don't want to see a repeat of that with NEP.


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Space Station Commander
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Post    Posted on: Wed Nov 16, 2005 6:42 pm
nihiladrem wrote:
campbelp2002 wrote:
Because I did my sums. The idea of using gravity as a tow line is valid and will work.
I think publiusr has doubts about the inherent reliablitiy of NEP (fairly complex with lots of possible points of failure and has to carry on working for a long time) rather than the gravity part of the tug. NTR would need to be heavier than NEP (though not for the 'special' case of Apophis). As Publi states, NTR has been practically demonstrated several times and is known to work.


Exactly.


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Space Walker
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Post    Posted on: Wed Nov 16, 2005 7:15 pm
publiusr wrote:
nihiladrem wrote:
campbelp2002 wrote:
Because I did my sums. The idea of using gravity as a tow line is valid and will work.
I think publiusr has doubts about the inherent reliablitiy of NEP (fairly complex with lots of possible points of failure and has to carry on working for a long time) rather than the gravity part of the tug. NTR would need to be heavier than NEP (though not for the 'special' case of Apophis). As Publi states, NTR has been practically demonstrated several times and is known to work.


Exactly.


Right. Our physics-educated comrade has succinctly and properly addressed what are valid concerns regarding one possible incarnation of the project which is the topic of this thread. This is considerably more constructive than the vitriol-injected, rambling, insult-spewing diatribe with which you opened your own contribution.

I'm not saying your opinion on the technology isn't valid, man, I'm saying that it is scarcely evident in your posts.

If you have concerns about the political motivations of the project, then you should speak to them specifically from the start, rather than sabotage your own credibility by seeking to discredit the technical work of people whom have publishing credits (e.g. Scientific American) to which none of us (excepting Cowboy, if he ever logs off and starts studying) will ever be able to aspire.


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Moon Mission Member
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Post    Posted on: Wed Nov 16, 2005 7:24 pm
All right all ready.

So SawSS1Jun21 says that publiusr says that nihiladrem says that I said I did my sums.

The show is OVER!


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Post    Posted on: Wed Nov 16, 2005 8:14 pm
SawSS1Jun21 wrote:
excepting Cowboy, if he ever logs off and starts studying


HEY, NOW!!! I RESEMBLE THAT REMARK!

Trust me, I'll be on just as much next semester, when I have things like Thermo, Statics, and (with any luck at all) a job at SpaceWorks Engineering, a small AE consulting company here in Atlanta. Why? Because this site keeps me up-to-date, and consciously thinking of space transport matters.

campbelp2002 wrote:
So SawSS1Jun21 says that publiusr says that nihiladrem says that I said I did my sums.


Beautiful, absolutely beautiful. Peter 1, Everybody Else 0.

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Post    Posted on: Sat Mar 14, 2009 1:42 pm
Gravity as a tool - what about gravitational sensors and detectors in deep space orbiting the sun or - at large distances - even Earth?

They might work similar to the experimental equipment applied in school to demonstrate gravity.

They might be applied to detect asteroids going into the direction of Earth.



What about it?



Dipl.-Volkswirt (bdvb) Augustin (Political Economist)


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Space Station Commander
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Post    Posted on: Sat Mar 21, 2009 3:07 pm
Magnetometers in a network around the sun to detect incoming asteroids? Charles Pooley might be interested in that for his microlaunchers?

Monroe

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