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The 40th Anniversary of 2001:A Space Odyssey

Posted by: aajiv - Sun Feb 10, 2008 6:30 pm
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The 40th Anniversary of 2001:A Space Odyssey 
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Post The 40th Anniversary of 2001:A Space Odyssey   Posted on: Sun Feb 10, 2008 6:30 pm
April will be the 40th anniversary of 2001: A Space Odyssey. A couple of aerospace engineers are in the process of writing an article about the spacecraft in film for a AIAA local section publication. Below is all the technical material I can find about the spacecraft.
Ordway and Lange apparently worked out more details than Ordway gives in the articles below.
The best source of technical information is actually in the Hagerty and Rogers book especially as concerns physical dimensions.
However we can't find any weight/mass specifications, a little is given by Ordway in the Spaceflight article. I looked at a copy of Bizony 2001 Filming the Future (2001) and there does not seem to be any in there.
Anyone around here been able to find such info or know of a source?
Fred Ordway says he might have it but it would be in his collection at Huntsville and won't be able to tell me until he visits there again.
We especially would like to know the Orion III mass* in order to estimate the design dimensions of the horizontal take off first stage. (It is not shown in the film because it is not needed in the film narrative. We are going with Clarke , a little vague, however the description in the novel seems to be that the first stage was some kind of horizontal take off and return winged vehicle similar to the Saenger II. Even tho I know that Lange had a kind of Saenger Sliverbird rail launched booster sketched once.)
Anybody estimated the weights from the dimensions given by Hagerty and Rogers?

*I note that in the Ordway Spaceflight issue he does mention the Orion III having a payload of 50,000 lbs. TSTO was in the air again as the film was being made ... Saenger and the Junkers RT 8-1-01.
Ordway says there could have been 20 passengers and 4 crew, do you need a payload of 50K lb to support that number of people?



F.I. Ordway, 2001: A Space Odyssey, Spaceflight, Vol. 12, No. 3, Mar. 1970, pp. 110-117. (Publisher: The British Interplanetary Society)

F.I. Ordway, Part B: 2001: A SPACE ODYSSEY IN RETROSPECT, Frederick I Ordway, III Volume 5, American Astronautical Society History Series SCIENCE FICTION AND SPACE FUTURES: PAST AND PRESENT, Edited by Eugene M. Emme, 1982, pages 47 - 105. (ISBN 0-87703-172-X) .

Jack Hagerty and Jon C. Rogers, Spaceship Handbook: Rocket and Spacecraft Designs of the 20th Century, ARA Press,Published 2001, pages 322-351, ISBN 097076040X.

Realizing 2001: A Space Odyssey: Piloted Spherical Torus Nuclear Fusion Propulsion NASA/TM-2005-213559 March 2005 AIAA-2001-3805


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Post Re: The 40th Anniversary of 2001:A Space Odyssey   Posted on: Mon Feb 11, 2008 2:37 pm
aajiv wrote:
Ordway says there could have been 20 passengers and 4 crew, do you need a payload of 50K lb to support that number of people?
I imagine the 50k lb "payload" would the entire orbital vehicle and not just the paying payload inside it. In other words payload is not the right word. Mass to orbit would be more correct.


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Post Re: The 40th Anniversary of 2001:A Space Odyssey   Posted on: Mon Feb 18, 2008 10:22 am
campbelp2002 wrote:
aajiv wrote:
Ordway says there could have been 20 passengers and 4 crew, do you need a payload of 50K lb to support that number of people?
I imagine the 50k lb "payload" would the entire orbital vehicle and not just the paying payload inside it. In other words payload is not the right word. Mass to orbit would be more correct.


Yes I am thinking that my self, I have never found a way to compute the mass/person for a commercial space-liner. If it is just 20 passengers plus 4 crew members and baggage for a one of two day flight to the space station just how much weight in environmental control system, GN&C, power , reaction control system and propellant, landing gear, thermal protection , odds and ends, per person do you need? Excluding main propulsion and propellant.


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