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The ISS might become as large as originally planned

Posted by: Ekkehard Augustin - Wed Jan 16, 2008 1:47 pm
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The ISS might become as large as originally planned 
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Post The ISS might become as large as originally planned   Posted on: Wed Jan 16, 2008 1:47 pm
According to the article "Space Station Modules Proposed by UK Scientists" ( www.space.com/businesstechnology/080116 ... h-iss.html ) says that
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The proposed Habitat Extension Module (HEM) would consist of two modules attached to the ISS Node 3 segment, a hub-like connecting module slated for a 2010 launch. The British addition would provide additional room and equipment for a permanent space station crew of six, as opposed to the current crew of three.


The artopicle later adds that
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Although ISS has plenty of experimental space for conducting scientific research, earlier plans for expanded living space were scrapped. The HEM modules would resurrect those facilities and provide enhanced protection for astronauts against space radiation.


An interesting information is that this would cost the UK $ 1 bio until 2015 - 7 to 8 yaers from now and thus $ 125 mio to $ 143 mio per year.



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Post    Posted on: Wed Jan 16, 2008 2:18 pm
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The ISS might become as large as originally planned


Being a smart ass: What about the Russian part? Their energy platform, lab modules, extensions?

Personally i doubt that the UK will pay for such a proposed extension. What would they get? I mean I'm currently not sure, but if my mind works correct they had that woman onboard I think Salyut 7 (edit: after I read my post I'm sure it had to be onboard Mir and not a Soviet but a Russian crew) which admired the view out of the window and cooked for the Soviet crew because she had basically nothing to do. Her flight was sponsored by private fundings as far as I remember.

And then the British have the US Astronaut born in the UK but flying under US flag. Forgot his name but he flew 2 or 3 flights ago.

I'm not aware of any manned/crewed British programme. Perhaps someone from the UK has a bit more info.

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Post    Posted on: Wed Jan 16, 2008 3:14 pm
Klaus Schmidt wrote:
Personally i doubt that the UK will pay for such a proposed extension. What would they get? I mean I'm currently not sure, but if my mind works correct they had that woman onboard I think Salyut 7 (edit: after I read my post I'm sure it had to be onboard Mir and not a Soviet but a Russian crew) which admired the view out of the window and cooked for the Soviet crew because she had basically nothing to do. Her flight was sponsored by private fundings as far as I remember.


Helen Sharman flew on Mir and it was as you say Klaus a private endeavour.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Helen_Sharman


Klaus Schmidt wrote:
And then the British have the US Astronaut born in the UK but flying under US flag. Forgot his name but he flew 2 or 3 flights ago.


Michael Foale was originally British but had to take up American citizenship to become an astronaut and fly in space for NASA. As much as I would love to go to space this seems a heavy price to pay to me. :)

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Michael_Foale

Piers Sellers was also British but became a US citizen in 1991.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Piers_Sellers

Klaus Schmidt wrote:
I'm not aware of any manned/crewed British programme. Perhaps someone from the UK has a bit more info.


At present the British government have explicitly opted out of any manned space programs with ESA or anyone else for that matter, which is why they are excluded from using the ISS for research. :(

Although there appears to be a small undercurrent from the science community to reverse this, as yet things have not changed. The UK government recently commissioned a report by the National Astronomical Society (I think) to determine whether there were sufficient gains (both scientific and financial) to be made by joining ESA's manned program. I think the government had expect the report to conclude (as previous ones had done) that it was not worth the expense and were surprised that it came out in favour of having a manned program. This has left it in the strange position of not wanting to commit the extra funds but not being able to use the old excuses it had in the past of "being of no significant or only marginal benefit to the UK economy". I believe the UK is the only member of the G8 group of countries who do not presently have a manned space program.

All this leads me to suspect that while the UK may be embarrassed into joining ESA's manned program at some point we are unlikely to put up the $1bn for extra units to the ISS, mores the pity.
:(

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