Community > Forum > Technology & Science > Navigation Methods for Space Fairing Vehicle

Navigation Methods for Space Fairing Vehicle

Posted by: ArcheAngel - Mon May 10, 2004 4:18 pm
Post new topic Reply to topic
 [ 17 posts ] 
Navigation Methods for Space Fairing Vehicle 
Author Message
Space Walker
Space Walker
avatar
Joined: Tue May 18, 2004 4:25 pm
Posts: 122
Post    Posted on: Wed May 19, 2004 2:42 pm
i doubt IEEE has any material directly on the subject but they might have stuff on hardened electronic systems, or maybe not, after all they are mostly concerned with more mundane civilian engineering standards.

if i've understood the reversal problem correctly the main problem for electronics would be the hypothesized (huge) electric storms. i think the main method of protection is meant to be some sort of faraday cage

the reversal problem is still a bit "out there" but having backup systems with different kinds of fail points is always smart anyways


Back to top
Profile
Moderator
Moderator
avatar
Joined: Thu Jun 03, 2004 11:23 am
Posts: 3745
Location: Hamburg, Germany
Post    Posted on: Sun Mar 01, 2009 9:24 am
Reading the article "Satellite Collision Avoidance Methods Questioned After Space Crash" ( www.space.com/news/090227-space-collisi ... tions.html ) I suppose that the navigation of satellites and space vehicles could and should be improved.

The article reports that
Quote:
DeCastro said. "Our team that monitors our constellation saw that the satellite was missing when it went missing. We didn't move the satellite because we didn't know we had reason to."


What about enabling all space vehicles, stations etc. to detect debris via near-distance-radar? The vehicles etc. are much closer to it and thus can detect much more precisely and much earlier, if there is a reason to move itself. This might save propellant perhaps because the danger is detected earlier and the distance to move can be determined more exactly.

Quote:
Unlike Iridium, CNES has at its disposal ground-based radars that, when used in conjunction with the U.S. two-line-element data, can provide a more-precise assessment of whether a given satellite faces a problem serious enough to warrant a collision-avoidance maneuver.


This might assist the idea I told about above but it also makes me think of a SETI@home-approach. A lot of data might have to be processed given the amount of debris circling around Earth. All vehicles etc. should be given all the actual data about orbits, size, mass and shape of the debris as well as vehicles. This might be too much for onboard-computers as well as for agencies. SETI@home might improve the situation.



What about it as well as about what can be rwad in the article?



Dipl.-Volkswirt (bdvb) Augustin (Political Economist)


Back to top
Profile
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 17 posts ] 
 

Who is online 

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 5 guests


cron
© 2014 The International Space Fellowship, developed by Gabitasoft Interactive. All Rights Reserved.  Privacy Policy | Terms of Use