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Germ of Mars-adjusted life

Posted by: Ekkehard Augustin - Fri Oct 28, 2005 10:50 am
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Germ of Mars-adjusted life 
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Post Germ of Mars-adjusted life   Posted on: Fri Oct 28, 2005 10:50 am
I have been thinking about using another thread for this but now I consider it to be that concrete that I decided to initate a new thread abotu it.

According to an article under www.wissenschaft.de researchers have modified a plant by injecting genes of the microbe Pyrococcus furiosus. It normally lives at temperatures of 100° C but it also has no problems with being thrwon into water of 0° C.

This is because it produces a protein which avoids the bad impacts of hyperoxide produced in situations of alert.

The gene producing that protein has been inserted into the plants tobacco, mustard and common wallcress for example - and it turned out that the gene still works in them and produces the required protein to be able to keep away those impacts of the hyperoxide that are deadly or at least bad.

A Mars-plant is still far away and this is basic research. But it might be a germ - of a way twoards such plants at least.

The researchers were Wendy Boss and Amy Grunden of the State-University of North-Carolina, Raleigh - according to that article.



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Post    Posted on: Sun Oct 30, 2005 8:59 am
It's nothing but clear that in the end of such research or project will be a plant or a non-plant microbe - and there may be no Mars-fit life resulting at all.

But if there would be something like that it seems to be that it would be required to keep it in a habitat or a greenhouse - simply to avoid the loss of the freed oxygen - if it would produce oxygen.

It could produce methane perhaps - but this too should occur inside somehting.

For real Mars-fit life it wouldn't be required to provide Earth-like temeperatures in the "greenhouse" or what ever it is contained by And perhaps the pressure could be below the earthian level too.

it could be a cheap source of ISRU-production of oxygen for living or methane for propulsion - a germ of cheap ISRU.

...
...
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Post    Posted on: Fri Aug 11, 2006 10:37 am
Under www.wissenschaft.de the re is an article today reporting that a bacterium has been found that still indicates signs of being alive at temperatures of -200°C - a temperature below the average or normal martian temperatures!

It's called Colwellia. That micorbe produces substances protecting it against cold and enzymes too doing that.

One mark where they still produced proteins of life was the temperature of liquid nitrogen. This is kept down to -196°C.

Their genome includes a lot of sections providing the informations how to produce the protections against cold and even extreme cold.

By this finding the probability of extraterrestrial life within the solar system is increased now.

The frozen water ressources of Mars as well as the ice crust of the jovian moon Europa now principially may be regions of life.

The article refers to the team of Karen Junge of the University of Washington, a second team of the University Seattle and New Scientist, August, 12th, page 35 ( www.newscientist.com/ ).



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Post    Posted on: Tue Oct 31, 2006 12:53 pm
In between there is an article under www.space.com about two microorganisms that suggest that really life might exist subsurface on Mars in salty water.

The article is "Antarctic Microbes Handle Mars-Like Conditions" ( www.space.com/scienceastronomy/061031_st_mars_life.html ).



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Post    Posted on: Fri Aug 24, 2007 11:18 am
The article "Claim of Martian Life Called 'Bogus'" ( www.space.com/news/070823_mars_life.html ) says that
Quote:
...While rare, terrestrial organisms are known to use hydrogen-peroxide. The bombardier beetle, Brachinus Crepitans, uses a 25 percent solution of hydrogen peroxide to shoot steam into the face of pursuing predators. ...
.

This simply is a hint to another example of terrestrial life that might mean that Mars-adjusted life could be gene-technically created or perhaps really found.

I don't refer to the focus of the article here but simply to add it: Under www.wissenschaft.de there is a german article about it that doesn't mention Pace but it refers to a lecture at European Planetary Science Congress ( meetings.copernicus.org/epsc2006/ )



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Post    Posted on: Fri Aug 24, 2007 1:26 pm
Well, the recorded amounts of methane have to come from somewhere, maybe it was the permafrost thawing or something like that. Anyway, science is a dirty business and a business indeed. And that's sad.


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Post    Posted on: Mon Nov 19, 2007 3:26 pm
Because of the threads discussing Terraforming, growing food and the like I sometimes think about the partially very different compositions of the planets of the solar system.

These difference make me think about the possibility that there may be permanent dependencies between planets to keep their inhabitability once they are terraformed. It also may be that they are permanently dependent of the Earth since Earth seems to offer very much of required chemicals needed to terraform a planet and to keep it terraformed.

On the other hand Earth may have advantages from terraforming the other planets and assisting in keeping them terraformed. In that case it seems to me as if there would have to be a permanent exchnage of chemicals etc. between those planets and Earth.

This apperas to me as if it would be a system-wide ecology as a whole that would have to be assisted by permanent traffic between all the planets involved and Earth. It would be similar to Earth as a planet where some regions are inhabitable while others are no - like the majority of the regions of the Mount Everest or the deserts.

What about it?



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Post    Posted on: Mon Nov 19, 2007 5:08 pm
I think it's a question of energy. IBM for example already played in the lab with re-arranging atoms, so I think that you can synthesize everything.

The habitable zone around a star of course is quite limited but can be extended e.g. by a large planet like Jupiter when you want to go to a moon there.

An interesting thing to think about is by Buzz Aldrin described in his book "Encounter with Tiber". There another race comes to Earth and gets sick because it can't "use" a certain Earth's proteine and get toxined. What if you go to Mars and your plants somehow mutate and humans no longer can't process that food?

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Post    Posted on: Fri Nov 23, 2007 11:37 am
I in between recognized that I was confusing two threads at my previous post - and so will copy it to the intended and correct post.

But this thread can be considered to have to do with it - although I didn't have particularly in mind life at my previous post in this thread.



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Post    Posted on: Sat May 16, 2009 5:26 pm
Under www.wissenschaft.de thee is an article telling that scientists have researched soy growing in or around Czernobyl.

It turned out that the soy there has developed protectional mechanisms against the radioactivity there. They achieve that by producing proteins in different amounts and composition than usual. This way the soy take in less radioactivity.

The germs are smaller and take in water more slowly.

The article refers to Biologists around Martin Hajduch of the slovakian Academy of Sciences ( www.sav.sk/?lang=en&charset=&doc=org-in ... tute_no=47 ) in Nitra and the Journal of Proteome Research ( pubs.acs.org/journal/jprobs ) (doi: 10.1021/pr900034u).

Might this be a chance that this soy is fit for Mars or might adjust itself to Mars regarding the level of radioactivity at the martian surface? Might the soyaround Czernobyl another germ of Mars-adjusted life?



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