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Future of such rovers after the prize is won

Posted by: Ekkehard Augustin - Tue Oct 09, 2007 12:44 pm
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Future of such rovers after the prize is won 
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Post Future of such rovers after the prize is won   Posted on: Tue Oct 09, 2007 12:44 pm
Which useful and interesting devlopments can be imagnied once the prize is won?

The question came up to me under the aspect that Shackleton Crater Company plans to mine propellants on the Moon. But other aspects may cause ideas also.

What about such small rovers equipped with sensors and miniaturized instruments searching for methane, LH2 and indicative gases like radon-222?

What about checking the bottom of Shackleton Crater for ice or hydrogen?

What would make such rovers into interesting equipment for lunar oriented industry and for space agencies?



Dipl.-Volkswirt (bdvb) Augustin (Political Economist)


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Post    Posted on: Tue Oct 09, 2007 2:44 pm
The only development which actually matters that it shows people that it can be done for a relative low price and weight and that the NASA-way is not the way to go if we want to settle space.


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Post Rover Copies   Posted on: Mon Oct 15, 2007 10:50 pm
As I have stated elsewhere, at least 20 copies of successful Google Lunar Rovers will be sold to enable the countries which invested $$ Billions to be "partners in the ISS" to do real, original exploration on the Lunar Surface (most of which HAS NOT been seen up close).

Being the first to examine new Lunar terrain, for an investment of $20 to $30 Million will be irresistible and also allow these countries to showcase the unique abilities of their industries and research centers in producing advanced analytical systems!

This is a very low cost to be a "Real Player" in space exploration!


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Post Re: Rover Copies   Posted on: Sun Oct 21, 2007 2:41 pm
rpspeck wrote:
This is a very low cost to be a "Real Player" in space exploration!


the winner rover (if any) will be TOO simple for scientific exploration and nothing (nearly) ALL countries' universities are able to design by theirself

the MAIN problem of that kind of prize always will be the earth-orbit/(soft)moon-landing travel ...and add the high price of rockets!

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Post    Posted on: Sun Oct 21, 2007 3:19 pm
There is no reason to suppose that a Google-XPRIZE-rover wouldn't be able to do or at least assist science.

As several probes sent to the Moon during the recnet years and this month also demonstrate photos are still of high scientific and explorational meaning even at investigation of the Moon.

The camera of a Google-XPRIZE-rover could be a high-resolution-camera, it could be an infrared-camera or a UV- and X-ray-sensor could be added.

Nothing of these do weigh too much. And the transmission-capcity may grow well until thfirst rover will be launched towards the Moon.



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Post    Posted on: Mon Oct 22, 2007 3:09 am
I simple camera has scientific value, if it can move far enough and last long enough. A rover that won the added prizes of lasting through a lunar night and traveling more than 5km would almost certainly be able to last many lunar nights and cover much more than 5km. That would have scientific value. But I would be surprised if anyone won that added prize. It just sounds too hard to do unless you spend way more than the prize is worth.


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Post    Posted on: Thu Nov 08, 2007 9:00 pm
Don't focus on the ROVER. Countries will be happy to pay the $20 to $30 million - including launch costs - to get their research payloads onto the Moon, whether they add innovative instruments to an existing rover or make their own (or more likely, both)!

This is real, original exploration on the Moon for the price of a "tourist" ride to orbit!

No such opportunity has ever existed. Many countries have spent ten to one hundred times this amount in the hope that being an "ISS Partner" would allow them to do original space research - without success.

Remember that we are talking about buying a PROVEN ride for your instruments to the surface of the MOON - something not accomplished by any country for decades - and all for a fraction of the price of any operational launch vehicle currently able to go above LEO.

We have cursory, closeup surface inspection of small zones around about 14 landing points on a Lunar surface about as big as North America. None are at the poles or radically different far side. Do we really imagine that no surprises await discovery?

Everything unexpected that shows up will be identified with the team and country which sent the exploration system, and even modest discoveries will bring a lot of prestige!

Their National sponsors will of course milk the attempt for all the attention they can get as well (just as they do when one of their citizens rides along to the ISS).


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