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Friendliest Countries for Private Launches?

Posted by: Spacerat - Fri Jul 25, 2003 3:43 am
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Friendliest Countries for Private Launches? 
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Post Friendliest Countries for Private Launches?   Posted on: Fri Jul 25, 2003 3:43 am
With the number of companies that I've seen propose building spaceports in Australia makes me wonder if that country might have the friendliest regulations for launching space vehicles. The USA certainly doesn't seem to and I wonder if if the USA is really the best place for the X-Cup to take place in if FAA regulations don't change.


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Post    Posted on: Tue Jul 29, 2003 7:54 pm
I seem to recall that a US citizen is bound by the FAA regulations for flying an aircraft, no matter where (i.e. what country) that US citizen flies it. If the Office of Commercial Space Transportation follows the same precedence for regulations and licensing of space vehicles, then I'd think that any potential regulatory advantage for US-led teams/companies to launch from countries other than the US would go away. No?


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Post    Posted on: Tue Jul 29, 2003 9:19 pm
Here:

http://www.okspaceport.state.ok.us/


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Post    Posted on: Wed Jul 30, 2003 5:57 am
I believe that a US registered aircraft (absent a few obscure exemptions, always flown by the holder of an FAA-issued pilot certificate) must adhere to the stricter of the FAA and local regulations, but there is no such restriction on US citizens. A US citizen may pilot an aircraft of foreign registration, although it usually requires obtaining an appropriate license from that country.


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Post Re: Friendliest Countries for Private Launches?   Posted on: Tue Aug 12, 2003 1:13 pm
Interesting that a nation which won't trust people with a simple pistol will trust them with a rocket, which has much more potential for damage.

Something funny about that.

Spacerat wrote:
With the number of companies that I've seen propose building spaceports in Australia makes me wonder if that country might have the friendliest regulations for launching space vehicles. The USA certainly doesn't seem to and I wonder if if the USA is really the best place for the X-Cup to take place in if FAA regulations don't change.


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Post    Posted on: Tue Aug 12, 2003 1:15 pm
That depends whether you worship the FAA as a diety, I suppose.

If I followed every rule imposed on me by the U.S. government, I long ago would have put myself out of my misery.

You were kidding though, right?

chantal wrote:
I seem to recall that a US citizen is bound by the FAA regulations for flying an aircraft, no matter where (i.e. what country) that US citizen flies it. If the Office of Commercial Space Transportation follows the same precedence for regulations and licensing of space vehicles, then I'd think that any potential regulatory advantage for US-led teams/companies to launch from countries other than the US would go away. No?


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Post    Posted on: Wed Sep 03, 2003 2:52 am
Russia will probably be the best. After that Switzerland, India, Korea, England, Australia and then . . . maybe the US.

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Post    Posted on: Thu Sep 04, 2003 6:32 pm
Don't forget China.


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Post    Posted on: Thu Sep 04, 2003 9:47 pm
You think China is going to let someone else fly in their airspace? Get real.


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Post    Posted on: Sun Sep 07, 2003 6:04 am
What about Brazil? After 3 failed launch attempts I'm sure they want to launch SOMETHING. Also, since the Brazillian launch site is at the equator, you can lift about 13% more cargo with the same amount of fuel than if you lift off in the US or Russia due to the faster velocity of rotation at the equator.


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Post    Posted on: Sun Sep 07, 2003 12:12 pm
13% more cargo at the equator for the same amount of fuel? That seems pretty dam beneficial! Is this a lesser or greater cost benefit than, say, choosing a country with a low dollar value?

How about the Northern tip of Queensland Australia, 10-15 degrees south of the equator. Queensland has a few unique laws out of the Aussie states, a poor man's Texas maybe...


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Post How about China?   Posted on: Wed Oct 15, 2003 9:41 pm
With China now a member of the 'Space-Enabled' group of countries (Previously only the US and USSR), they might be able to accomidate a private launch... Sure, they may want some of the technology but maybe they would be welcom to more good press regarding their involvement in space travel.

Sure, I know about the restrictions on the prize regarding government assistance and the like. Just wanted to throw in my comments on this one.

Ken
KC7RAD


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Post China rapidly changing   Posted on: Fri Oct 17, 2003 10:16 pm
In the last week, China has put its first man in orbit and Ford invested $1 billion US Dollars in China for automobile manufacturing. Change is happening at almost inconceivable speed. Sure there are obstacles now, but for how much longer?

12 months ago, I could not conceive of having a business in China. Today I do.

Food for thought, at this moment, the FAA's focus is on how to say NO and China's focus is on how to say YES. Today, the US CAN NOT put a man into space, whereas China CAN!!!


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Post    Posted on: Fri Nov 28, 2003 10:48 pm
Oh gosh darnit! I know this is childish and all that, but let's stop to think about the extremes folks will go just to speed on the the highways on earth. No price seems to high, especially if a second party is willing to supply insurance coverage.
Space travel is a different breed all together, get it? You can cook up the fine, even clock the speeder and have his or her home address, but who you going to elect to slap the ticket on the speeder's windshield.

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Post    Posted on: Sat Nov 29, 2003 3:40 am
soapsudz wrote:
Space travel is a different breed all together, get it? You can cook up the fine, even clock the speeder and have his or her home address, but who you going to elect to slap the ticket on the speeder's windshield.


haha, but why have speeding laws for space? it's not like we don't have enough of it for everyone to the who knows how high of a power, and the faster you go the more efficient. now i know that's usually true with cars too, but in space it's probably more dangerous to go slow than to go fast


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