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CEV Mockup Pictures

Posted by: Klaus Schmidt - Thu Nov 17, 2005 9:39 pm
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Space Walker
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Post    Posted on: Thu Feb 16, 2006 11:48 pm
Griff is saying that it is effectively all "new" (see his remarks at the end of this piece)

http://news.yahoo.com/s/nm/20060216/sc_nm/space_nasa_dc

...but he sure sounds like a guy whom has his head properly wrapped around the problem... and he seems to be focusing on stumping for more funding, which is going to be key in clearing some of the time-critical problems, I think.


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Post    Posted on: Fri Feb 24, 2006 11:09 pm
I just wish the pointy heads used to a goldin Delta II handout every other week would lay off him.

Pic:
http://www.lockheedmartin.com/data/assets/12043.pdf


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Post    Posted on: Tue Apr 18, 2006 9:58 pm
It seems that NASA hasn't completely abandoned LOX/Methane engines yet, Marshall are still doing some work on them.

http://www.spaceref.com/news/viewpr.html?pid=19608

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Post    Posted on: Wed Apr 19, 2006 2:32 am
Andy Hill wrote:
It seems that NASA hasn't completely abandoned LOX/Methane engines yet, Marshall are still doing some work on them.

http://www.spaceref.com/news/viewpr.html?pid=19608

...and entered into two different development contracts for the engines:
http://biz.yahoo.com/prnews/060418/dctu007.html?.v=54
http://biz.yahoo.com/prnews/060418/dctu006.html?.v=48


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Post    Posted on: Wed Apr 19, 2006 11:49 am
The engine mentioned in the spaceref article I posted has a thrust of 20,000 lbs while the contracts are for 7,500 lb engines, do NASA want a range of engines then?

I thought they were interested in an LOX/Methane engine for the lunar (and later Mars) assent vehicle. Anyone remember how much thrust was needed for that?

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Post    Posted on: Wed Apr 19, 2006 11:09 pm
The 7500 lbf motors appear to be most accurately suited to the requirements specified for OMS activites of CEV and/or (as you suggest) LSAM ascent stage.

The ESAS Final contains Technology Project recommendations on pg 642, Item #5 is:
Quote:
Human-rated, 5–20 klbf class in-space engine and propulsion system (SM for ISS orbital operations, lunar ascent and TEI, pressure-fed, LOX/CH4, with LADS). Work also covers 50–100 lbs nontoxic (LOX/CH4) RCS thrusters for SM.


Sounds like that's the right ballpark.


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Post    Posted on: Tue Apr 25, 2006 7:09 am
Lockheed have released a few details of some of the CEV components. They are talking about using Boeing avionics.

http://www.flightglobal.com/Articles/20 ... onics.html

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Post    Posted on: Wed May 03, 2006 6:47 pm
Here's a bit more on the CLV with some timescales. It seems a bit optimistic to me, flight testing in 2011 seems a bit quick for a NASA project.

http://www.flightglobal.com/Articles/20 ... table.html

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Post    Posted on: Thu May 04, 2006 8:40 pm
Hi Andy,

Neither of those links is working for me.

5 years from design to flight test may be fast for today's NASA, but Apollo happened that fast.


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Post    Posted on: Fri May 05, 2006 7:20 pm
Hello Peter

The link works OK for me, here's the text:

Quote:
Flight tests of the Crew Launch Vehicle’s (CLV) upper stage will begin in the second quarter of 2011, according to the development timetable presented at NASA’s industry day on 19 April.

The CLV upper stage will push the four-/six-person Crew Exploration Vehicle (CEV) from a suborbital trajectory into low- Earth orbit (LEO). The CEV/CLV first and upper stage stack will be 94m (309ft) tall, have a gross take- off weight of 909,000kg (2 million pounds) and have a 25t-to-LEO payload capacity. The flight tests will continue through 2011 and 2012.

During the CLV’s 10min flight the first stage will separate after 131s at 195,600ft and the upper stage engine fire at 133s and burn for 463s. During this time the CEV capsule’s launch abort system is ejected. The 5.5m-diameter aluminum-lithium upper stage will be powered by a Apollo-derivative liquid-oxygen/liquid-hydrogen J-2X engine and will contain the avionics and reaction control system, providing the roll control needed for the first stage’s flight.

A request for proposals for the upper stage is planned for the fourth quarter of 2007.

According to the industry day presentation by CLV upper-stage element manager Danny Davis, the contract would be placed by the third quarter of 2008.

The schedule also shows that manufacturing process development will begin this year and avionics development tests should start in the second quarter of 2008. At the same time the battleship stage will organise engine hot fire and pressurisation system performance tests.

From the end of 2008 the vibration test article work starts, which sees dynamic testing at NASA Marshall Spaceflight Center in Alabama. The qualification hardware fabrication and testing is in the first quarter of 2009 and flight unit manufacturing starts in 2010.

Although the CLV and NASA’s proposed 125t-to-LEO Cargo Launch Vehicle are described as Shuttle-derived, NASA designates the CLV upper stage as a clean-sheet design.

The systems requirement review for the CLV’s first stage will be in September, at the same time as the CEV. ATK has been awarded a $28.6 million contract to continue developing the first stage, which is a recoverable five-segment solid rocket booster that uses polybutadiene acrylonitride propellant.


Agreed, Apollo was pretty quick but then money was no object, things are a bit diffferent today.

http://www.wstm.com/Global/story.asp?S=4863696&nav=2aKD

Boehlert is one of NASA's biggest supporters and even he is saying there is not enough cash to plug the gap between shuttle retirement and CEV flying. I think it is starting to look like the shuttle will fly after 2010.

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Post    Posted on: Tue May 09, 2006 9:29 pm
Here's some more on the LOX/Methane engine, ATK are sub-contracting XCOR to do development. They confirm the engines will be used to return the CEV from Lunar orbit to the Earth.

http://www.xcor.com/XCOR_ATK_methane-engine.html

$10.3M for ATK of which they give $3.3M to XCOR, I wonder what ATK are going to produce with their $7M XCOR has at least done some LOX/Methane work in the past.

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Post Astronautix on CEV   Posted on: Fri Jun 02, 2006 4:45 pm
The guys at astronautic think NASA has made a mistake with CEV capsule design:

Quote:
It looked like the errors of the original Apollo program would be repeated. A three-module spacecraft, as used successfully on Soyuz and Shenzhou, was rejected. Instead the sole crew habitat space would be the re-entry vehicle, which would be a 41% scaled up version of the Apollo command module. This would have over three times the internal volume and double the surface area of the Apollo capsule, but NASA claimed its mass could be limited to only 50% more than the Apollo design. Despite the increase in volume and mass, it would provide accommodation for only four to six crew (versus three to five in Apollo).


Source: http://www.astronautix.com/craftfam/cev.htm


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Post    Posted on: Fri Jun 02, 2006 6:25 pm
Mr Wade has never hid his dislike of the ESAS (and Simple Safe Soon ATK design) architecture.


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Post    Posted on: Fri Jun 09, 2006 7:41 pm
He updated his site. I don't like the new look.


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Post    Posted on: Wed Sep 27, 2006 12:22 pm
Hello, Andy Hill,

one of the jpegs of the article "Project Orion: NASA's Next Spaceship Takes Shape" seems to confirm the use of oxygen and methane. The image CEV Crew Module lists GO2/GCH4 as propellant(s).



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