Community > Forum > Technology & Science > Uranium at the moon?

Uranium at the moon?

Posted by: Ekkehard Augustin - Wed Jun 01, 2005 5:32 pm
Post new topic Reply to topic
 [ 27 posts ] 
Uranium at the moon? 
Author Message
Moderator
Moderator
avatar
Joined: Thu Jun 03, 2004 11:23 am
Posts: 3745
Location: Hamburg, Germany
Post    Posted on: Thu Jul 28, 2005 7:54 am
Peter wrote

Quote:
Ekkehard Augustin wrote:
Quote:
Some scientists suppose that the core of Earth is liquid because huge amounts of radioctive material is part of it.

I never heard that. Do you have a reference?


I didn't find my previous information, article etc. but today there are these articles:

"Experimental investigation of geologically produced antineutrinos with KamLAND" ( www.nature.com/nature/journal/v436/n705 ... 03980.html ) and "Ghostly particles unearth core radioactivity" ( www.nature.com/news/2005/050725/full/050725-7.html )


The first of these articles says
Quote:
The detection of electron antineutrinos produced by natural radioactivity in the Earth could yield important geophysical information. The Kamioka liquid scintillator antineutrino detector (KamLAND) has the sensitivity to detect electron antineutrinos produced by the decay of 238U and 232Th within the Earth. Earth composition models suggest that the radiogenic power from these isotope decays is 16 TW, approximately half of the total measured heat dissipation rate from the Earth.




Dipl.-Volkswirt (bdvb) Augustin (Political Economist)


Back to top
Profile
Moon Mission Member
Moon Mission Member
avatar
Joined: Tue Feb 10, 2004 2:56 am
Posts: 1104
Location: Georgia Tech, Atlanta, GA
Post    Posted on: Mon Aug 01, 2005 1:26 pm
Ummmm..... Yeah. For those of us who can't understand the nuclear physics gibberish posted above, the idea of the Earth's core being heated by slow nuclear reactions within is pretty old and generally accepted.

_________________
American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics
Daniel Guggenheim School of Aerospace Engineering

In Memoriam...
Apollo I - Soyuz I - Soyuz XI - STS-51L - STS-107


Back to top
Profile
Space Station Member
Space Station Member
avatar
Joined: Thu Jan 27, 2005 12:34 am
Posts: 450
Post    Posted on: Tue Aug 09, 2005 8:47 pm
Heat conduction through even metals thousands of miles thick is pretty slow. Iron or steel welding rod is often hand held (with the end melting). It doesn’t take a very high power level to sustain a high temperature drop through an enormously thicker body of iron (the Earth’s core)!


Back to top
Profile WWW
Moon Mission Member
Moon Mission Member
User avatar
Joined: Tue Oct 05, 2004 5:38 pm
Posts: 1361
Location: Austin, Texas
Post    Posted on: Wed Aug 10, 2005 1:00 pm
I had read that radioactive elements in the mantle were suspected of causing the unexpectedly high temperatures in deep mine shafts at least 30 years ago but had never seen anything suggesting radioactivity in the core. It would make sense though. The densest materials should naturally end up in the center of the forming Earth and uranium is certainly dense.


Back to top
Profile WWW
Moderator
Moderator
avatar
Joined: Thu Jun 03, 2004 11:23 am
Posts: 3745
Location: Hamburg, Germany
Post    Posted on: Mon Jul 30, 2007 10:43 am
The article "Lunar Flash Mystery Solved: Moon Just Passing Gas" ( www.space.com/scienceastronomy/070730_gassy_moon.html ) is reporting a speculation that at the Moon gases are released that might be the products of decaying uranium:
Quote:
... It is likely that the ghostly and fleeting TLP could be a manifestation of inert gases such as radon and argon being released from within the moon due to radioactive decay of uranium-238 and potassium K-40. ...
.



Dipl.-Volkswirt (bdvb) Augustin (Political Economist)


Back to top
Profile
Moderator
Moderator
avatar
Joined: Thu Jun 03, 2004 11:23 am
Posts: 3745
Location: Hamburg, Germany
Post    Posted on: Fri Aug 24, 2007 11:06 am
More than two years ago I said I would look for the sources of my informations that the earthian core would be liquid because of radioactive materials in it - and in the last few days there was a longer article under www.wissenschaft.de telling that indeed there is a theory saying something like that.

It's a bit strange - but the geologist Marvin Herndon has said that the
core of Earth is a huge nuclear reactor - and it will run out of fuel in a few hundred million years. This theory is said to be able to explain a few things no other theory can explain up to now. If it would be correct then it would mean that Earth was the core of a gas giant before the nuclear reactions in the sun ignited.

Assumed the theory is correct - would it allow for uranium on the >Moon?



Dipl.-Volkswirt (bdvb) Augustin (Political Economist)


Back to top
Profile
Spaceflight Participant
Spaceflight Participant
User avatar
Joined: Tue Oct 16, 2007 1:04 am
Posts: 56
Location: Brisbane, Australia
Post    Posted on: Fri Apr 18, 2008 2:11 am
According to our theories of of Earth-Luna formation, Luna is made up of mantle material from proto-Earth and at some point Luna was complitely melted if I remember it correctly. Theoretically this makes native Luna surface extrimely depleted in heavy metals, including Uranium. However metal asteroids should be rich in Uranium ore and Luna has been bombarded by those for billions of yrs, so I expect that at least some of the craters have commercially viable quantities of Uranium, Gold and Platinum.

_________________
I've become Death, the Destroyer of worlds...


Back to top
Profile
Moderator
Moderator
avatar
Joined: Thu Jun 03, 2004 11:23 am
Posts: 3745
Location: Hamburg, Germany
Post    Posted on: Sat May 17, 2008 3:48 pm
Today there is an article under www.wissenschaft.de saying that scientists suppose a huge nuclear reactor 2,900 km beneath the earthian surface. At the border between the mantle und the core Uranium, Thorium und Plutonium could have enriched sufficiently to keep a nuclear chain reaction running. The performance is supposed to be 5 terawatts or that of 5000 artificial nuclear reactors. Although the concentration there is supposed to be 20 times toom low geological processes may have increased concentration and density of the material to an amount sufficient to ignite the reactions. This might explain isotope ratios of Helium and Xenon that can't be explained another way up to now. Futurely possible detection of antineutrinos would indicate the natural detectors directly according to the article. It refers to Rob de Meijer, University Kapstadt, and Wim van Westrenen, Free University Amsterdam, as well as to Nature, Online Service, DOI 10.1038/news.2008.822 ( www.nature.com/nature/index.html ).

Since the lunar diameter is 3,450 km it would be interesting if the material the Moon consists of might partially stem from that depth. This may depend on how and where the supposed Mars-sized planet crashed into Earth riping of the lunar material and on the question if that early time sufficient Uranium, Thorium and Plutonium already were at that region.

If the concentration was insufficient for nuclear reactions that time there never may have been such reactors n the Moon and Uranium as well as Thorium and Plutonium might be to be found in the depths of the Moon...


Dipl.-Volkswirt (bdvb) augustin (Political Economist)


Back to top
Profile
Moderator
Moderator
avatar
Joined: Thu Jun 03, 2004 11:23 am
Posts: 3745
Location: Hamburg, Germany
Post    Posted on: Fri Feb 06, 2009 5:36 pm
Just this moment I remembered the ancient natural nuclear reactor in Africa. Its activity depended on random rain causing a bit of water to flow through the uranium layer - only then it was active because water as moderator is required.

As far as I remeber or understand for this reason only the uranium was consumed that time to a degree that it was noticed in our days.

Since there is no water on the Moon - what about the chance that lunar Uranium has not decayed as much as at that location in Africa if there is Uranium on the Moon? If I understand correctly in reactors additional decay is caused.

What do you think?



Dipl.-Volkswirt (bdvb) Augustin (Political Economist)


Back to top
Profile
Spaceflight Trainee
Spaceflight Trainee
User avatar
Joined: Tue Jun 15, 2004 12:02 pm
Posts: 49
Location: Antwerp, Belgium
Post Re: Uranium at the moon?   Posted on: Wed Jul 01, 2009 11:55 pm
Check this out http://spacefellowship.com/2009/07/01/psi-scientist-and-kaguya-team-find-first-conclusive-signature-for-lunar-uranium/

It seems your are right :wink:

_________________
Science may set limits to knowledge, but should not set limits to imagination.


Back to top
Profile WWW
Space Station Commander
Space Station Commander
User avatar
Joined: Mon Oct 06, 2003 9:22 pm
Posts: 843
Location: New York, NY
Post Re: Uranium at the moon?   Posted on: Thu Jul 02, 2009 4:31 am
all my hopes and dreams of a nuclear powered spacefaring civilization are now possible due to lunar uranium being free from political stigma!!

_________________
Cornell 2010- Applied and Engineering Physics

Software Developer

Also, check out my fractals


Back to top
Profile
Moon Mission Member
Moon Mission Member
User avatar
Joined: Mon Nov 01, 2004 6:15 pm
Posts: 1233
Location: London, England
Post Re: Uranium at the moon?   Posted on: Fri Jul 03, 2009 8:18 am
So I guess we'll see a rush of countries trying to grab the Uranium, watch out for those pesky terrorists making a bid for that fisonable material. :)

_________________
A journey of a thousand miles begins with a single step.


Back to top
Profile WWW
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 27 posts ] 
 

Who is online 

Users browsing this forum: Optimistic Brian and 22 guests


© 2014 The International Space Fellowship, developed by Gabitasoft Interactive. All Rights Reserved.  Privacy Policy | Terms of Use