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Mars Now, Saturn Moon Titan for Next Robot Lander from Earth

Posted by: Matthew17 - Fri Jan 30, 2004 12:13 am
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Mars Now, Saturn Moon Titan for Next Robot Lander from Earth 
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Post Mars Now, Saturn Moon Titan for Next Robot Lander from Earth   Posted on: Fri Jan 30, 2004 12:13 am
Mars Now, Saturn Moon Titan for Next Robot Lander from Earth



High Knob, Va. --- Amateur astronomers make take notice of the brightness of Saturn in the clear night skies with the "Lord of the Rings" --- the planet Saturn --- brightly shinning and marking the very next stop after Mars for exploring American spacecraft.

Just as the Mars Exploration Rovers 'Spirit' and 'Opportunity' have captured American imagination to explore the red planet, next January, 2005 will make an even more remarkable journey through the solar system by a spacecraft landing vehicle to a moon of Saturn.

The Saturn moon Titan is one the three objects in the solar system that astrobiologists believe may harbor some signs of life along with the planet Mars and the remote moon Europa of Jupiter.

Titan and Europa are the only two moons within the solar system that have atmospheres and possible liquid oceans.

Titan being a candidate for the discovery of life, NASA and the European Space Agency (ESA) launched a 1997 mission to Saturn called "Cassini-Huygens." After years of deep space flight, the time of arrival rapidly approaches.

The NASA Cassini space probe will enter the Saturn moon system with a fly-by of its most distant orbiting moon on June 11, 2004 and start orbital operations at Saturn on July 1, 2004.

The Cassini probe will provide new images to Earth of worlds yet to be fully explored by human space vehicles through 2008 and 74 orbital revolutions of Saturn.

The major highlight of the Saturn mission will begin December 24, 2004 when the Huygens landing probe departs its mothership Cassini to begin its 22-day landing cycle to the surafce of the Saturn moon Titan on January 14, 2005 --- now less than a year.

The Huygens lander is a contribution of the European Space Agency. And, the Huygens moon lander and Saturn orbiting NASA probe Cassini will together mark a new adventure in solar system space exploration.

The landing on Titan will be the first attempt to place a robot space probe on a moon of another planet in January, 2005. The major question for space scientists will be whether or not the space probe lands on a hard surface or a liquid ocean on this stange moon only visited previously in a fly-by mission of the Voyager spacecaft in 1980.

Huygens will carry with it an assortment of science instruments to measure the atmosphere, provide images, and take soil or water samples beaming data back to Earth.

Humans will still be sorting through the vast amount of image and science data from 2004 Mars landers when the Huygens probe will be landing at Titan and providing bizzare data about the alien world never before seen.

The discoveries to be made at Titan pose the notion that humans will become less taken by the science and exploration of Mars as the new world of Titan becomes a household word of Earthlings in 2005.

Huygens may cause humans to a greater realization of the vast amount of solar system there is yet to be explored

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Post    Posted on: Fri Jan 30, 2004 2:23 am
Matthew17,

Can you also include the URL of the article...?
We don't need the whole article.. just an intresting part or an opinion with it.. but the real website is always the best to read... cause most of the time they include pictures or other info.

And if you copy, keep atleast the credits.

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Post    Posted on: Fri Jan 30, 2004 2:25 am
wow.... i've never heard of that before, suprising. sounds cool definitely, titan is from all appearances one of the coolest places in the solar system (no where near triton though :lol:). methane rain anyone?


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Post    Posted on: Fri Jan 30, 2004 11:04 pm
What would be really neat is if the Mars rovers manage to survive through July. Then I could be looking at Cassini's pictures of Saturn and MERs' pictures of Mars -- at the same time!


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Post    Posted on: Sat Jan 31, 2004 3:03 am
I heard some where that these rovers could last much longer then they where made to do so.

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Post Titan   Posted on: Mon Feb 09, 2004 2:56 am
Titan is especialy interesting to me for it's low gravity and high atmospheric density. (atmos is 50% denser then earths with a gravity in the range of our moon) Winged flight there should be NO problem. :)

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Post    Posted on: Mon Feb 09, 2004 3:17 am
hmm... i hadn't thought of that, but you have a good point. maybe they're considering using gliders instead of a more normal lander for some future flights there.


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