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Life Support System Challenge

Posted by: space - Wed Sep 01, 2004 4:16 am
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Life Support System Challenge 
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Post    Posted on: Thu Sep 02, 2004 11:00 am
My point speaking of terrariums etc. are the people. These people may be interested to win the prize(s) you are proposing.

So the prize(s) doesn't need to be too high.

Might be there will be a lot of competitors - and a lot of results.

There will have to be a catalog of requirements to participate in the competiton that may be fulfilled easyly.

This possibility can be compared to the astronomical research on variable stars - this research to a large amount is done by amateurs and they are given criteria, measures by the scientists.

Perhaps this way is providing positive side-effects from the view of the greens. ...



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Post Kevin Kelly's experience with self-contained aquariums   Posted on: Thu Sep 02, 2004 12:27 pm
Kevin Kelly, an editor at Wired Magazine, has written about EcoSphere and Biosphere 2 in his book Out of Control (1994). The entire book is on his web site.

He also has a web page (dated July 19, 2004) on his EcoSphere and EcoCosm.


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Post    Posted on: Sun Oct 17, 2004 8:19 am
idiom wrote:
The reason the Biosphere had to be so big is that plants need to have a huge systems to even out stochaticisms into a steady state. The main proble with Boi2 is that it wasn't big enough.


Biosphere 2 had to be so big in order to replicate an entire terran 'ecosystem' in accordance with the metaphysical principles of it's designers. Those principles and the eco-philosophy behind them lead to the failure of the experiments. These were based on mysticism, not engineering or science.

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Post    Posted on: Tue Dec 14, 2004 12:09 pm
There's an interesting article today in space.com titled "Life-Swapping Scenarios for Earth and Mars" ( http://www.space.com/scienceastronomy/m ... 41213.html ).

This article may be interesting concerning the topic of this thread.

And - should a WTN XPRIZE proposed based on this thread?



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Post    Posted on: Tue Dec 28, 2004 8:53 am
Better late then never ;)


Like mentioned before in this topic, its probably best to create a closed environment in steps. Get your typical huge-ass space station first, start adding plants all over the place, maybe even a big garden (if you have at least some gravity) and then start converting sections of the station into animal farms, etc etc. Essentially converting more then 60% into a breathable world / ecosystem.

If you bring along plants with produces the most oxygen and uses the most co2 and how needs the less light and which have to be reasonably small, you dont have to change/renew does damn co2 storage cilinders every x months. It's simply cost-effective.

The idea of starting small and have many of these things is simply perfect for this. Everybody with an airtight casing can create this and simply start hobbying along, you dont need to be a scientist to do trial and error. The high costs in such an enclosed 'world' will be the sensors to measure oxygen, co2, etc levels.


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Post    Posted on: Tue Jan 11, 2005 3:33 am
Is it just me, or has anyone else noticed that most of the mass in the Universe is not on Earth? People worry too much about closed systems. If you allow for regular supplies of water and/or rock, the whole problem becomes much simpler.

There's a whole Solar System of matter out there people, lots of it already broken into handy chunks of ice, carbonates, silicates, nickel/iron and platinum group metals. Let's go out and use it!


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Post    Posted on: Tue Jan 11, 2005 8:05 am
The trouble is a lot of it is zipping a long at a fair rate and you've got to catch it, be able to steer it where yuou want and eventually slow it down and place it in orbit.

Putting aside these difficulties and the fact that if you got it wrong you might be sending hunks of rock hurtling towards the Earth's surface, once in orbit no one would be allowed to use it for mundane things like oxygen production as herds of scientists would want to crawl all over it for research. Well maybe the first chunk anyway. :)

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Post    Posted on: Tue Jan 11, 2005 8:10 am
At this point the problem of property rights and ownership on bodies in space is going to be involved.

There are ways and methods to keep the scientists away from preventing the use of a rock for producing oxygen and something else.



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Post    Posted on: Tue Jan 11, 2005 8:30 am
I think property rights and ownership are pretty low down on the scale to worry about.

The technolgy required is the most important problem to address and secondly the cost, it probably costs much more (Several orders) to do this than send stuff up on a rocket from Earth. I dont know what what NASA is paying for the impact mission but to actually tow something into orbit, or possibly the L point between Earth and Moon, would be much more expensive.

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