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Asteroid passing below some of our satellites on feb 15

Posted by: SANEAlex - Tue Jan 15, 2013 8:30 pm
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Asteroid passing below some of our satellites on feb 15 
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Post Re: Asteroid passing below some of our satellites on feb 15   Posted on: Tue Feb 26, 2013 11:23 am
Far be it for me to introduce some facts, but here goes...

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-21579422

Basically an Apollo asteroid. Which I think means unrelated to the near miss on Feb 13th.


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Post Re: Asteroid passing below some of our satellites on feb 15   Posted on: Tue Feb 26, 2013 1:19 pm
That is the same story Alex posted. And it is not "fact". It is a hypothesis, based upon it's atmospheric track and the presumption not evidence, that it entered directly from it's orbit like a bullet from a gun.

Anyway, I'll stop the defense of my pet theory before I wind up looking (more) like I'm wearing tin foil. Either way hopefully this brings more attention and resources to the asteroid hunt and space in general. I bet a whole bunch of Russians are.


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Post Re: Asteroid passing below some of our satellites on feb 15   Posted on: Tue Feb 26, 2013 4:42 pm
JamesHughes wrote:
Far be it for me to introduce some facts, but here goes...

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-21579422

Basically an Apollo asteroid. Which I think means unrelated to the near miss on Feb 13th.


Asteroid 2012 DA14 was also an Apollo asteroid before the close flyby:

2012 DA14.
Quote:
Minor planet category Post 2013-Feb-15: Aten[2][3]
Pre-2013: Apollo NEO[2]
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/2012_DA14


Also this image shows how greatly the orbit of 2012 DA14 was changed by the close flyby at 17,000 miles away:

Image

Imagine then how greatly the orbit could be altered if a meteor passed by at only 10 miles away.

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Post Re: Asteroid passing below some of our satellites on feb 15   Posted on: Wed Feb 27, 2013 9:53 am
JamesG wrote:
That is the same story Alex posted. And it is not "fact". It is a hypothesis, based upon it's atmospheric track and the presumption not evidence, that it entered directly from it's orbit like a bullet from a gun.

Anyway, I'll stop the defense of my pet theory before I wind up looking (more) like I'm wearing tin foil. Either way hopefully this brings more attention and resources to the asteroid hunt and space in general. I bet a whole bunch of Russians are.


It may be hypothesis, but it's one entirely consistent with all the known facts. Like Evolution, and QED :o

Whereas your pet theory doesn't necessarily agree with all the known facts.

Not saying your pet theory is wrong of course, but it's much less likely to be right. Occams razor and all that.


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Post Re: Asteroid passing below some of our satellites on feb 15   Posted on: Wed Feb 27, 2013 2:14 pm
Its at least as likely probabilistically as the officially accepted theory.


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Post Re: Asteroid passing below some of our satellites on feb 15   Posted on: Thu Feb 28, 2013 5:33 pm
RGClark wrote:
Meteor expert Clark Chapman and former astronaut Rusty Schweickart urge U.S. military to re-initiate sharing of satellite detections of meteor impacts:

Russian Meteor Fallout: Military Satellite Data Should Be Shared.
by Leonard David, SPACE.com’s Space Insider Columnist
Date: 18 February 2013 Time: 09:03 AM ET
http://www.space.com/19846-russian-mete ... lites.html

From links in the article, the military formerly did share this information but the policy was changed in 2009. This is important because the satellites reportedly have the capability to detect meteors down to 1 meter wide and below. This would well have the capability to determine if close asteroid flybys result in increased meteor impacts.


This video or ones like it may also be able to address this question:

An Asteroid's Parting Shot.
By Phil Plait
Posted Tuesday, Feb. 19, 2013, at 8:00 AM
http://www.slate.com/blogs/bad_astronom ... video.html

The video shows asteroid 2012 DA14 slowing moving through the frame, and
meteors and artificial satellites streaking rapidly through the frame.
Assuming we are able to distinguish the satellites, perhaps by
knowing already their positions, then perhaps we can determine if the
number of meteors shown here are higher than normal.
Better would be longer exposures that include at least the time
period of the Russian meteor impact.

Bob Clark

_________________
Single-stage-to-orbit was already shown possible 50 years ago with the Titan II first stage.
Contrary to popular belief, SSTO's in fact are actually easy. Just use the most efficient engines
and stages at the same time, and the result will automatically be SSTO.
Blog: http://exoscientist.blogspot.com


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Post Re: Asteroid passing below some of our satellites on feb 15   Posted on: Fri Mar 01, 2013 5:23 pm
RGClark wrote:
This video or ones like it may also be able to address this question:

An Asteroid's Parting Shot.
By Phil Plait
Posted Tuesday, Feb. 19, 2013, at 8:00 AM
http://www.slate.com/blogs/bad_astronom ... video.html

The video shows asteroid 2012 DA14 slowing moving through the frame, and
meteors and artificial satellites streaking rapidly through the frame.
Assuming we are able to distinguish the satellites, perhaps by
knowing already their positions, then perhaps we can determine if the
number of meteors shown here are higher than normal.
Better would be longer exposures that include at least the time
period of the Russian meteor impact.


The Fireballs of February.
Feb. 22, 2012
Quote:
...
They all hail from the asteroid belt—but not from a single location
in the asteroid belt," he says. "There is no common source for these
fireballs, which is puzzling."
This isn't the first time sky watchers have noticed odd fireballs in
February. In fact, the "Fireballs of February" are a bit of a legend
in meteor circles.
Brown explains: "Back in the 1960s and 70s, amateur astronomers
noticed an increase in the number of bright, sound-producing deep-
penetrating fireballs during the month of February. The numbers seemed
significant, especially when you consider that there are few people
outside at night in winter. Follow-up studies in the late 1980s
suggested no big increase in the rate of February fireballs.
Nevertheless, we've always wondered if something was going on."
Indeed, a 1990 study by astronomer Ian Holliday suggests that the
'February Fireballs' are real. He analyzed photographic records of
about a thousand fireballs from the 1970s and 80s and found evidence
for a fireball stream intersecting Earth's orbit in February. He also
found signs of fireball streams in late summer and fall. The results
are controversial, however. Even Halliday recognized some big
statistical uncertainties in his results.
...
http://science.nasa.gov/science-news/sc ... fireballs/


Note this was from last year, not this year in regard to this
February's unusual meteor and asteroid encounters. But what's key is
the article notes this has been noticed in other February's.
The article suggests greater number of fireballs in February. It also
mentions they are typically slow, long-lasting, and penetrate deep in
the atmosphere. I don't know about the slow part, but the long-lasting
and deep penetration aspects could be due to larger meteors during
February's.
If there is an association with the 2012 DA14 asteroid, then since
it has approximately a year long orbit, this could explain why the
fireballs are seen frequently in February. Note it was discovered
last year in February also during a close approach.
Also notable are the two orbital crossings per year of the asteroid
2012 DA14 with respect to the Earth's orbit:

La Sagra Observatory discovers very near-Earth asteroid 2012 DA14.
Posted By Jaime Nomen
2012/03/27 05:20 CDT
Quote:
The preliminary orbit shows that 2012 DA14 has a very Earth-Like
orbit with a period of 366.24 days, just one more day than our
terrestrial year. The orbit is nearly circular but just elliptical
enough to jump inside and outside of the path of Earth two times per
year. Because objects move faster when they are closer to the Sun, the
relative motion is similar to some sports races: when the Earth is on
the outer track, it is overtaken by 2012 DA14, but when the asteroid
crosses Earth's orbit, Earth overtakes it and passes by. It is during
the orbit crossings when the closest encounters occur, and when there
is potential for a future impact.
http://www.planetary.org/blogs/guest-blogs/3418.html


Astronomer Steven Willner noted this could result in rather close approaches
on the second crossing as well. This could explain the observation of Ian
Halliday that there seems to be a statistical increase also in late Summer and Fall.

In any case, the Air Force needs to release its satellite detections
of these fireballs. For one thing they might be able to detect the
meteors before they have any appreciable interaction with the
atmosphere. For large meteors, of oblong shape, the atmospheric
interaction could alter their direction, thus giving a misleading
interpretation of their original orbits.

For many people the Air Force not sharing all the technical means at
its disposal led to the loss of the shuttle Columbia crew. It must not
be said that its keeping its meteor detections capability secret led
to the loss of an entire city.


Bob Clark

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Single-stage-to-orbit was already shown possible 50 years ago with the Titan II first stage.
Contrary to popular belief, SSTO's in fact are actually easy. Just use the most efficient engines
and stages at the same time, and the result will automatically be SSTO.
Blog: http://exoscientist.blogspot.com


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Post Re: Asteroid passing below some of our satellites on feb 15   Posted on: Thu Mar 21, 2013 10:34 pm
How about a new hypothesis concerning the timing of Russian meteor and the close approach event:

Some vast, extraterrestrial intelligence is trying to warn us of the urgent need for a meteor/comet defense system for our fragile earth-bound civilizations.
:roll:

Asteroid headed toward Earth? 'Pray,' NASA advises

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Post Re: Asteroid passing below some of our satellites on feb 15   Posted on: Fri Aug 16, 2013 5:06 pm
An update on the plume produced by the Russian near miss

http://www.theregister.co.uk/2013/08/15 ... nsk_plume/

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Post Re: Asteroid passing below some of our satellites on feb 15   Posted on: Sat Oct 12, 2013 1:36 pm
Meteor Sparks Incredible Fireball Over US Midwest (Video).
By Miriam Kramer, Staff Writer | September 30, 2013 03:18pm ET
Quote:
"This was a very bright event," Bill Cooke of NASA's Meteoroid Environment Office told Spaceweather.com. "Flares saturated our meteor cameras, and made determination of the end point (the terminus of the fireball's flight through the atmosphere) virtually impossible. Judging from the brightness, we are dealing with a meter class object."
http://www.space.com/23001-meteor-fireb ... video.html


By Deborah Byrd in
BLOGS | EARTH | HUMAN WORLD on Sep 28, 2013
U.S. sees another bright fireball on September 27.
Quote:
September 2013 has been busy for sightings of bright fireballs. The one at 11:33 p.m. local time on September 27 was the 14th fireball sighting in the U.S. in September.
The American Meteor Society (AMS) has reported at least 373 reports of another bright fireball – a very bright meteor, likely a small chunk of natural incoming space debris – over the U.S. last night (September 27, 2013). These reports followed a similar event over approximately the same area the day before (September 26). The AMS called the coincidence of two bright fireballs, or bright meteors, spotted over approximately the same region on consecutive days "surprising." Witnesses from Georgia, Illinois, Indiana, Kentucky, Maryland, North Carolina, New York, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Tennessee, Virginia, Wisconsin and West Virginia reported a bright light moving across the night sky on September 27 at around 11:33 p.m. local time, according to the AMS.
Fireball might sound ominous, but it is just the word astronomers use to mean bright meteor. As seen from a whole-Earth perspective, fireballs are seen often. It’s unusual to have two appear on consecutive nights over the same region, however.
September 2013 has been a busy month for sightings of bright meteors, according to the AMS. Last night’s event marks the 14th fireball sighting with at least 25 witnesses in September, the most ever since the AMS started recording sightings online, they say.
http://earthsky.org/earth/u-s-midwest-s ... t-fireball


The coincidences keep building and building ...

Bob Clark

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Single-stage-to-orbit was already shown possible 50 years ago with the Titan II first stage.
Contrary to popular belief, SSTO's in fact are actually easy. Just use the most efficient engines
and stages at the same time, and the result will automatically be SSTO.
Blog: http://exoscientist.blogspot.com


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Post Re: Asteroid passing below some of our satellites on feb 15   Posted on: Sat Oct 12, 2013 8:02 pm
Not sure about coincidences but as more data arrives they might have to update the statistical probabilities.

http://www.wired.com/wiredscience/2013/ ... nt-impact/

Mind you if its true "Earth experiences an airburst explosion similar in energy to Hiroshima almost every year" i am surprised there has not been more broken glass filmed in the last decade even if the majority happen over the oceans or uninhabited areas.

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Post Re: Asteroid passing below some of our satellites on feb 15   Posted on: Sat Oct 12, 2013 10:15 pm
The harder you look, the more you see. I don't think we can draw the conclusion that there are more meteor events than there used to be, unless we can somehow credibly estimate the extent of and compensate for the enormous increase in recording and communication capabilities of our species. We have a similar thing in ecology: most species of organisms are observed and recorded more often now than they ever have been in the past, but if you take out the observation bias, they're actually mostly in decline. The same could easily be true for meteor events.

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Post Re: Asteroid passing below some of our satellites on feb 15   Posted on: Sun Oct 13, 2013 12:37 am
SANEAlex wrote:
Not sure about coincidences but as more data arrives they might have to update the statistical probabilities.

http://www.wired.com/wiredscience/2013/ ... nt-impact/

Mind you if its true "Earth experiences an airburst explosion similar in energy to Hiroshima almost every year" i am surprised there has not been more broken glass filmed in the last decade even if the majority happen over the oceans or uninhabited areas.


Thanks for the interesting article.

Bob Clark

_________________
Single-stage-to-orbit was already shown possible 50 years ago with the Titan II first stage.
Contrary to popular belief, SSTO's in fact are actually easy. Just use the most efficient engines
and stages at the same time, and the result will automatically be SSTO.
Blog: http://exoscientist.blogspot.com


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Post Re: Asteroid passing below some of our satellites on feb 15   Posted on: Sun Oct 13, 2013 2:49 pm
Lourens wrote:
The harder you look, the more you see. I don't think we can draw the conclusion that there are more meteor events than there used to be, unless we can somehow credibly estimate the extent of and compensate for the enormous increase in recording and communication capabilities of our species. We have a similar thing in ecology: most species of organisms are observed and recorded more often now than they ever have been in the past, but if you take out the observation bias, they're actually mostly in decline. The same could easily be true for meteor events.


Yes its not that not that there are more meteor events its that with better data it looks like the bigger ones happen more often than previously thought. I think with the satellite imagery of recent years we have been finding scars in jungles and deserts and have been roughly able to date them so that what were once thought to be once in a thousand year events could be once in a hundred year events. With the random nature of these things it could be that we have just been unlucky with a cluster of them in the last century. Or we could be considered to be exceedingly lucky as the big ones have left streaks of glass in deserts and killed a few trees in Siberia along with some in a few jungles.

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Post Re: Asteroid passing below some of our satellites on feb 15   Posted on: Mon Oct 14, 2013 7:26 pm
If these large bolide impacts occur more frequently than thought, that is also a worrisome possibility.

Bob Clark

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Single-stage-to-orbit was already shown possible 50 years ago with the Titan II first stage.
Contrary to popular belief, SSTO's in fact are actually easy. Just use the most efficient engines
and stages at the same time, and the result will automatically be SSTO.
Blog: http://exoscientist.blogspot.com


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