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Harvesting...(?)

Posted by: Ekkehard Augustin - Fri Jul 04, 2008 6:37 pm
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Harvesting...(?) 
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Post Harvesting...(?)   Posted on: Fri Jul 04, 2008 6:37 pm
Richard Speck a short time ago mentioned a Hydrogen Farm in another thread - it was Lunar ISRU if I remember correct. And I also seem to remember that he talks about it in the General Micro Space Forum.

Because of two articles about Mercury this caused me an idea that would be an extension of such a Hydrogen Farm. I already was thinking about getting rid of the Oxygen and Hydrogen blown away from Mars by the Solar Wind long ago but got the hint that this occurs high in the atmosphere of Mars.

Mercury doesn't have such an atmosphere and as far as I understand it material blown away by the solar wind stems from the surface directly.

The article "Volcanoes on Mercury Solve 30-year Mystery" ( www.space.com/scienceastronomy/080703-m ... enger.html ) says that
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When the solar wind hits Mercury's surface its sputters particles off into the magnetosphere. MESSENGER detected these ionized atoms as it sailed through the magnetosphere; it found silicon, sodium, sulfur and even water ions surrounding the planet.
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So what about harvesting those atoms directly on the surface? It would have to be materials melting at temperatures aboce those on the mercurian surface.

In particular the water ions may be interesting...

But the thought may be of interest beyond Mercury - what about the asteroids as well as other large rocky planets Is material blown away there also? If so then the idea of a Farm could be applied there since the temepratures are far below the mercurian ones.

Is looking like different kind of Mining.

What about it?



Dipl.-Volkswirt (bdvb) Augustin (Political Economist)


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Post    Posted on: Sun Jul 06, 2008 3:10 am
Mining via ram scoops- The concentrations are exceedingly sparse, even by solar wind standards, which is pretty thin too. You would probably need a huge "net" going a health precentage of C to collect enough mass to make it worth while. Might as well just land on the rocks and get dirty.


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Post    Posted on: Sat Aug 16, 2008 8:29 am
It seems that water perhaps might be harvested from Enceladus. An article under www.wissenschaft.de says that the geysers have a diameter o around one meter.

So it seems to be possible to cover them by containers to catch the water.

The article "Cassini Spots Icy Jet Sources on Saturn Moon" ( www.space.com/scienceastronomy/080815-c ... ladus.html ) says that
Quote:
The images show the fractures are about 980 feet (300 meters) deep, with V-shaped inner walls.
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So even this might be no problem - the entire length of the fractures might be covered by a long container.

This way Enceladus might be made habitable to a low degree or hte water might be harvested and brouht to Mars or other planets. Another alternative might be to crack it and enable refuelling of space vehicles at Enceladus - but this I would prefer to do harvsting from the rings.



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Dipl.-Volkswirt (bdvb) augustin (Political Economist)


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Post    Posted on: Sat Aug 16, 2008 12:12 pm
By the time we are capable of routinely doing that, we'll have moved beyond chemical rockets.


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Post    Posted on: Sat Jan 17, 2009 10:28 am
According to an article under www.wissenschaft.de it seems that methane clouds are to be found on Mars in summer mainly.

So it might be possible to cover areas in seasons where methane production is at minimum and harvest the later production this way.



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