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using lunar soil

Posted by: Ekkehard Augustin - Sat Jun 07, 2008 11:17 am
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using lunar soil 
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Post using lunar soil   Posted on: Sat Jun 07, 2008 11:17 am
The article "Moon Dust Could Be Used to Build Lunar Lodgings" ( www.space.com/scienceastronomy/080604-l ... crete.html ) tells about lunar concrete.

An
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...innovative recipe of carbon, glue and moon dust...
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...could be used to build homes on the moon...[/quote and
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...also be helpful in building other structures on the moon, including giant telescopes and solar power arrays...
.

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To build a telescope the size of the Hubble Space Telescope, Chen suggests scaling up the recipe to about 130 pounds (60 kilograms) of epoxy and 1.3 tons, or 2,600 pounds (nearly 1,200 kg) of lunar dust.


Chen and Rabin envision creating a telescope mirror spanning 164 feet (50 meters) in diameter on the moon. Such an observatory would dwarf the largest optical telescope in the world — the 34-foot (10.4-meter) Gran Telescopio Canarias, also called the Great Telescope Canary Islands.


A monster telescope or two such telescopes working in concert on the moon could help in the search for extrasolar planets and make detailed observations of distant galaxies, Chen said.


The lunar concrete is got this way:
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To arrive at the concrete recipe, Chen and his Goddard colleagues including Douglas Rabin, mixed small amounts of carbon nanotubes and epoxies (glue-like materials) with simulated lunar dust, or crushed rock that has the same composition and grain size as dust on the moon.


After several iterations, one of which yielded what Chen described as "gooey and smelly," the team created a strong material with the consistency of concrete. Next, they coated the material with epoxy and spun the wet lunar concrete to form a 12-inch-wide (30-centimeter-wide) bowl-like structure shaped like a telescope mirror.


"After that, all we needed to do was coat the mirror blank with a small amount of aluminum, and voilà, we had a highly reflective telescope mirror," Rabin said. "Our method could be scaled-up on the moon, using the ubiquitous lunar dust."


What creative ideas do you have?



Dipl.-Volkswirt (bdvb) Augustin (Political Economist)


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Post    Posted on: Sun Jun 22, 2008 1:53 am
Since most of the Moondust is silicon oxide, It be pretty easy to make reinforced glass as a building material on the moon, the energy budget is a bitch but... My personal favorite is building out of aluminium oxide buildings. :lol:

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Post    Posted on: Fri Jun 27, 2008 2:14 pm
Another application for this is to use it to build solar furnaces for power generation and smelting materials etc.


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