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Terraforming Mars - How do we do it? Can it be 'fast'?

Posted by: zinfab - Tue Jul 27, 2004 5:52 pm
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Terraforming Mars - How do we do it? Can it be 'fast'? 
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Post    Posted on: Wed Aug 08, 2007 12:47 pm
Regarding local terraforming the article "Death-Defying Mars Rovers: Riders in the Storm
" ( http://www.space.com/includes/iab.html? ... pdate.html ) is reporting an interesting aspect:
Quote:
It turns out -- given all that dust flittering about in Mars' atmosphere -- the temperatures don't get nearly as cold at night. And that means that nighttime survival for a rover becomes much easier than it is when the skies are clear, Squyres advised
.

To me this is sounding as the dust in the atmosphere during the present dust storm has asignificant greenhouse effect.

So if craters would be covered to do local terraforming it might be interesting to keep the "roof" transparent to let sunlight in but cover that transparent roof by sufficient amounts of dust - as a layer - to provide a greenhouse effect for keeping or achieving certain temperatures below the roof.

This thought could be modified so that there are areas or zones that are NOT covered by dust and others that really ARE covered by dust. Or the dust layers might be removable or throttable or so.

...



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Post    Posted on: Sun Aug 19, 2007 3:13 pm
Since I posted about fuel-producing bacteria a few days ago in another thread - what about using such bacteria to terrafor Mars? They might be applied perhaps to transform the toxic and acidic dust into earthlike ones and in parallel produce fuels or chemicals fuels ould be made of.

It's just an idea of the moment I still have to think about - but what about it?



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Post    Posted on: Mon Oct 08, 2007 8:20 am
The most recent scientific results seem to mean that there never was liquid water on Mars - most places where water had been assumed to have flown at in the past turned out to be formed by lava or by sand instead of by water.

Of course this is the present interpretation by scientists which may change again in the future - but assumed it is correct what about terraforming then?

What about turning the acidic and toxic dust into water by cracking, splitting or reducing the molecules of H2SO4, H2SO3 and the like?

There is another finding the source of which I have to look for again: The deep wide oceans of earthian water are there because oxygen is shifted from ironoxyde to majorite in the depth of the earthian mantle. The majorite gets to the earthian surface where it breaks because of the low pressure thus the oxygen is released and reacts with water comming from the depth also.

Such a mechanism doesn't exist on Mars which appears to be one major reason for the lack of water in comparison to Earth. How to handle this situation? ...



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Post    Posted on: Wed Aug 06, 2008 8:22 am
Just a few moments ago I read in articles of www.welt.de as well as www.wissenschaft.de that Perchlorate has been found on Mars. The articles say that this reduces the chances that life might be found on Mars or might have been there in the past but that's not for sure, because Perchlorate isn't that stable.

Just that instability may be a source to do local terraforming perhaps - which is my personal impression only.

I had a look to the german version of wikipedia and found that Perchlorate is available at the ISS to enable Oxygen-production in case of emergency.

So what about using martian Perchlorate to get oxygen inside habitats - if it really exists on Mars? Is that an easier way than cracking acids etc.?

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Post    Posted on: Wed Sep 10, 2008 10:22 am
One of the tasks, challenges and problems regarding terraforming and colonising Mars is the amount of water available and accessable there.

So what about applying rpspeck's idea of hydrogen farming to provide more hydrogen on Mars?

Richard Speck's thought is to apply thin layers of Titanium on the lunar surface to let the protons of the solar wind chemically react with it and later to crack the molecoels formed again. This would release the protons = hydrogen.

Could martian oxygen be kept from escaping the planet this way also to some degree? Then water could be produced.

Of course there are lots of hydrogen and oxygen in the oxydizng martian dust and H2SO4.

Another problem needs to be mentioned. It has been dound that an observable portion of the martian oxygen is a heavy isotope of oxygen. What about the toxicity of this isotope? Deuterium is said to nbe toxic because its higher mass in comparison to hydrogen would turn water to flow less easyly which would have a negative impact on the human metabolism.

What about it?



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