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Solutions for impacts of Space on the human body

Posted by: Ekkehard Augustin - Mon Feb 11, 2008 11:25 am
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Solutions for impacts of Space on the human body 
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Post Solutions for impacts of Space on the human body   Posted on: Mon Feb 11, 2008 11:25 am
According to an article under www.welt.de today in the section "Wissenschaft" bones generate an electrical field around them by themselves when set under stress - like when a human has to apply his muscles to work on something or is doing sports etc. . That field makes the bones grow and become stronger because proteins are dipoles and add themselves to the bone.

This Rüdiger Kniep from the Reserach Deprtment for Anorganic Chemistry in Dresden has found.

So what about using this find to stop or avoid bone loss in space by applying electricity? What about looking for ways to make bones generating the electric field another way than gravitationally based stress?



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Post    Posted on: Mon Feb 11, 2008 8:06 pm
One method exists and is in use: elastic stress on bones as I suggested in my "Gravity Sim Suit" and actually used in the Russian "Penguin Suit".

"Rubber Bands" in your clothing have much lower mass and systems impact than centrifugally generated "Gravity".


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Post    Posted on: Mon Feb 11, 2008 10:23 pm
I have yet to find any reliable source that says the Russian Penguin suit has been proved to slow bone or muscle deterioration in microgravity. For example here is a typical source that just says more research is needed.

http://www.desc.med.vu.nl/Students/DeHo ... apter5.htm

I do know that even with 2 hours per day of exercise the ISS astronauts continue to experience muscle and bone loss throughout their time in microgravity and that the bone loss continues for several months after they return to Earth.


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Post    Posted on: Tue Feb 12, 2008 2:10 am
I don't understand what the fuss is all about. A 10m radius centerfuge spining at 6 rpm would generate 40% Earth gravity, that should be enough to negate the effects of microgravity. Just about everybody agrees that 6rpm would be tolerable for all but motion sick people. 10m radius structures aren't that hard to build in space even with today's launcers. It's even small enough to put on interplanetary craft.

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Post    Posted on: Tue Feb 12, 2008 11:30 am
Please note that the finding the article is reporting seems to mean that the way and methods applied at present will not have the effects desired. They seem to train muscles but don't replace the stress got under gravity.

The point is that the finding says that electric fields are involved - so it might be sufficient to cause the electric fields the bones generate under stress.

Because of this the interesting question is if proper electric fields can be caused without the stress available under gravity - since the gravity is unavailable in orbit or on objects or planets of significantly less mass than Earth.

There is an interesting detail the article is telling - the researchers can explain by the new finding why an external electric field supports or assists teh recovery of broken bones.

So might an external electric field in aboard space vehicles, in the ISS or in a space suit reduce the rate or amount of bone loss? Might such fields prevent that loss? Is it healthy to be subject to such field permanently or must there be pauses and interruptions (limited to periods of sleep for example)? Might it be that then no trainings and exercises in space are required to handle bone loss?



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Post    Posted on: Sat Aug 02, 2008 11:37 am
In between an article under www.welt.de is reporting that scientists have found a substance that imitates - or mimics??? - the effect of condition training. This works at mice in the lab at least.

This might be a way to avoid intensive training.

According to the article the performance of the mice has been increased in combination with training but really might avoid training completely, It makes the muscles "think" that they have been trained.

This has been reported by the american journal Cell.

The article refers to Ronald M. Evans of the californian Salk-Institute in La Jolla.

So what about combining weak electrical fields to avoid bobe loss with this subsance in space to reduce the time of training and thus enabling the astronauts to do more work? Or - more interesting what about thes two to keep the health of passengers doing personal space flights?



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Post    Posted on: Wed Dec 31, 2008 1:53 pm
I previously discussed solutions for the impact of radiation elsewhere where I might add this later. And I still consider solutions for bone loss the main focus of this thread.

But there is a finding reported by an article under www.wissenschaft.de that appears to fit into this thread as well since the human body seems to be subjected to it to some degree.

According to that article scientists have found in the lab that a commercially available vinacious core extract causes self-destruction of leukemia cells.

As far as I remember leukemia is one of the main cancers space radiation can cause - so the extract might be something astronauts might apply to avoid or handle leukemia in its earliest stages.

The extract is known to have effects on skin-, breast-, intestinal and lung-cancer as well.

But it's very far yet from being clinically confirmed.

The article refers to researchers around Xianglin Shi, University of Kentucky in Lexington, and Clinical Cancer Research (1. of January 2009) ( clincancerres.aacrjournals.org/ ).


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