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SF-problem with an aspect for reality...

Posted by: Ekkehard Augustin - Mon Aug 20, 2007 10:36 am
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SF-problem with an aspect for reality... 
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Post SF-problem with an aspect for reality...   Posted on: Mon Aug 20, 2007 10:36 am
Since the american physicist Alcubierre has found that the warp-drive is physically possible there was another look into it that is said to have identified an error in Alcubierres analysis.

Let'S keep that aside - then there is quite another argument - a scientist has argued that a flight applying a warp drive is extremely dangerous because prior to the warping it has to be made sure that no rocks or planets are at the point to be warped closer to the vehicle.

Now the aspect that might be a question for reality also: The vehicle applying a warp drive will have sensors and telescopes. All these have a critical distance from beyond which they can't get safe and sure informations or data. So first the warp could be limited so that regions beyond that critical distance are warped as close to the vehicle as the critical distance or even a bit closer. After that and having identified no dangerous rocks or planets or having found a course avoiding them the region could be warped closer to the vehicle until the vehicle is in that region.

Parallel to this the telescopes and sensors would get informations of additional regions.

Because of this I have problems to agree to the scientist and think that his issue should be modified - the warp factor has to be limited so that there is sufficient time for the telescopes and sensors to investigate the regions most recently warped closer to the vehicle than their critical distance.

This is an aspect for reality because even without warp drives the critical distances of sensors, telescopes and cameras might be limiting factors for velocities of vehicles - in regions of high frequency of debris rocks etc. at least. These might be the saturnian rings and regions close to them for example.



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Post    Posted on: Mon Aug 20, 2007 4:07 pm
The most logical the thing to do and probably an area where star trek is not so much as bad sci-fi is to not use warp-drive within a solar system. Simply to many objects. Just use it as an interstellar propulsion system. That's, probably badly, asuming there are not many objects outside a solar system until the next solar system.

/edit/
I'm counting the oort cloud also into the solar system. Unless it stretches to the next system. Is there any info on that?


Last edited by Stefan Sigwarth on Mon Aug 20, 2007 7:51 pm, edited 1 time in total.



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Post    Posted on: Mon Aug 20, 2007 4:56 pm
Oort cloud... :(


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Post    Posted on: Tue Aug 21, 2007 1:29 pm
The Oort cloud is hypothesized to extend as much as half way to the next star system. If all star systems have such large oort clouds, then they pretty much fill the galaxy. By the way, I once calculated the average distance between comets in the cloud. Starting with a couple simple assumptions I got several hundred million miles between comets. That is less dense than the inner solar system.


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Post    Posted on: Fri May 29, 2009 5:49 pm
Just a few moments ago I remembered an event reminding to what the scientist argued by - there was the Mariner probe hit by a meteor storm.

There had been no check if something might be approaching or become approached itself. Of course that was impossible since the star field would have had to be very large. In the case of the warp drive that field would be much smaller.

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Post    Posted on: Fri May 29, 2009 6:11 pm
i think if we can make a warp drive we can probably dodge a few comets.... besides, simple common sense should tell you that the odds of running into one of them by accident in something the size of a spaceship are so close to 0 that it doesn't matter anyways.

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