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Equipment to handle or meet psychological problems in space?

Posted by: Ekkehard Augustin - Wed Aug 22, 2007 12:12 pm
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Equipment to handle or meet psychological problems in space? 
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Post Equipment to handle or meet psychological problems in space?   Posted on: Wed Aug 22, 2007 12:12 pm
Under www.welt.de I found an artcile today reporting that technological progresses are breathing new life into old methods that in between are considered to be cruel or the like.

There is a pacemaker for brains for example while depressions successfully have been healed applying magnetism and current/electricity.


Of course I am far from suggesting to do this during manned space missions - in particular because some methods required narcotization. The point for starting this thread is that they are designed to reestablish the equilibrium of the chemistry in the heads of depressive patients. Other are meant to regulate extreme reactions of patients.

In so far it's all therapy - might there be somehting in it that can be applied to avoid the requirement of psychologists at travels to Mars (for example)?

But there is something beyond that also. The European Academy in Bad Neuenahr-Ahrweiler(Germany) has in mind the artificial improvement of the tasks of the brain. The article mentions a study titled "Intervening in the Brain. Changing Psyche and Society". It's considering pacemakers for the brain, neuro-prosthesises, neuron-transplantations and future methods.

The scientists have come to the conclusion that memory and creativity are improved by the methods and don't be against ethics. They might improve the performance of the brain.

Improved creativity and improved performance would be good for manned space missions it seems to me.

What about it?



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Post    Posted on: Wed Aug 22, 2007 3:51 pm
Stuff like that scares me. It makes Frankenstein look nice by comparison. We are well on our way to becoming the Borg. I am glad I will not live long enough to see it but I fear for my children.


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Post    Posted on: Sat Oct 20, 2007 1:19 am
It looks like a beginning for cojoiners (an obscure sci-fi reference). While there is nothing principaly wrong with the idea of "brain stimulants" I would be wary of unproven tech. I am more in favour of "traditional" way of relieving stress through comp games and training simulations, although the time lag would be a bitch for those who like it in the "loop".

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Post    Posted on: Sat Oct 20, 2007 9:16 pm
The military already uses drugs and stimulants to increase the fighting capability of soldiers. The next step I think we'll see in the next ten years will be the first implants.

Of course you won't need stimulants but narcotics and their equivalent implants.

But as long as (long duration) spaceflight is such an exclusive club you can hand-select the participants.

Another thing to mention: One shouldn't reflex-like oppose medical use of "drugs" or things like electricity. For example long duration cosmonauts (I'm not sure about astronauts) get certain drugs for several weeks before their return to Earth.

The medical use of electricity is quite normal, I myself already got dozens of times electrical therapies (got plugged to electricity for up to 30 minutes) for my joints.

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Post    Posted on: Tue Nov 13, 2007 12:16 pm
As far as I have understood the article nobody is going to be altered or changed by the new methods. It sounds to me as if simply the existing capabilities, talents and so on are stabilized, improved and assisted.

There will be tests in the lab and as far as humans would be subject to tests they will be volunteers only.

I also think that each of the methods will be watched and checked closely and critically to prohibit everything that would hurt ethics.

In so far nothing is to feared I think.



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Post    Posted on: Fri Oct 17, 2008 4:35 pm
Under www.wissenschaft.de there is an article today mentioning that transkranial Magnetostimulation is a promising therapy for depressions.

So magnetic fields might be of help (which might be an analogon to another post of mine in another thread suggesting electric fields to stop and avoid bone loss in zero gravity).

What about it?



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