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Prototype of a self-repairing vehicle-hull

Posted by: Ekkehard Augustin - Fri Sep 09, 2005 10:14 am
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Prototype of a self-repairing vehicle-hull 
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Post Prototype of a self-repairing vehicle-hull   Posted on: Fri Sep 09, 2005 10:14 am
Under www.wissenschaft.de there is an article today reporting that the first prototype of a self-repairing space vehicle-hull consisting of 192 cells has been developed. Each cell is connected to its meighbours only but not to a central unit or so.

Each cell consists of a pressure-sensor and a processor which knows rules and methods for repairs. It is bale to communicate to its neighbours.

The article refers to New Scientist (10th of September, page 25) ( www.newscientist.com/home.ns ).

This could be one additional solution for some problems mentioned in the Starships thread as well as for vehicles designed for missions within the solar system - from my point of view it could be well tested at the ISS and satellites futurely to be launched.



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Post    Posted on: Fri Sep 09, 2005 6:21 pm
That is going to be needed for sneak meteor storms not charted.


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Post    Posted on: Fri Sep 09, 2005 9:50 pm
"sneak meteor storms"? Like, they hang out on Lunar Farside and whisper to each other "Hey, guys, let's all gang up on this poor sucker -- oughta be able to take the wind outta his sail, if you catch my drift!"

Meteoric Muggers..... What next?

:P

Quite a good idea, publius, regardless of me having fun with the way you said it.

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Post    Posted on: Sun Sep 18, 2005 8:16 am
Just this moment I felt reminded to the human skin healing itself. Since there are speculations about radiation-resistant or radiation-consuming microbes able to survive in space I am short about wondering if something biological might be possible too. Ass far as I know scientists succeeded in making human cells grow in the lab - I am not sure if there were skin cells among these.

Dr_Keith_H, do you know something about this? Am I completely wrong in what I suppose to remeber and is it complete nonsense perhaps?



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Post    Posted on: Mon Jan 23, 2006 11:42 am
The article "ESA; Spacecraft, heal thyself" ( www.spacefellowship.com/News/?p=1468#more-1468 ) seems to be reporting another project about a technology of selfhealing vehicles.

According to the article it will take ten years at least until something like this could be applied to real space vehicles.



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Post    Posted on: Wed Jan 25, 2006 12:41 pm
Under www.wissenschaft.de there is a german article about the technology today. It says that glass-fibers are used which are 0.06 mm thick and have space inside. they are used in a composite (!).

Some of the glass-fibers were filled with Epoxy while the others were filled with a hardener. At damage the fibers were broken, the Epoxy and the hardener mixed and the mix hardened.

It also has been tested in vacuum under space conditions and at weightlessness.

Next the developers will incorporate the fibers and their contents into other more stabile materials and test their behaviour at high temperatures.

The article points out that ESA has in mind protection at impacts of micrometeorites and at stress by high variations of temperature.

The article refers to the New Scientists ( www.newscientist.com ) and to the developers who are Ian Bond und Richard Trask ( http://www.aer.bris.ac.uk/research/fibres/gfrp.html ).

I personally would find it interesting what meaning this could have for reusability since reentry menas high temperature and nozzles are set to high temperatures when the engines are firing.



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Post    Posted on: Fri Jan 27, 2006 5:02 am
A simple form of self-healing hull and radiation shield for inter-planetary flight, is 2 or 3 layers of ice between composite panels. Any micro-meteor strike will melt the ice in the area struck, or it can be deliberately heated, then the water will re-freeze sealing the hole.


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Post    Posted on: Sun Apr 02, 2006 3:57 pm
Could special piezo-electric fibers which transmit impact-energy to a microprocessor be helpful to avoid damages to vehicle hulls in case of impacts of micro-meteorites and micro-debris? According to Wirtschaftswoche the processor generates a counter-oscillation within five milliseconds and thus reduces the impact-shock by more than 50%. It is used in the haft of tennis rackets.



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Post    Posted on: Sun Feb 11, 2007 9:59 am
The newest edition of the german journal Wrtschaftswoche is reporting about megatrends. One of the trends considered is Nanotechnology.

One capability of future Nanotechnologies mentioned is that they are thought to be capable of self-organization and repairs.

This reminded me to the self-repairing vehicle-hulls.

It seems to me that self-organising molecules and particles combined with what already has been considered here might a step further.

What about it?



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Post    Posted on: Mon Feb 19, 2007 11:53 am
An article under www.wissenschaft.de 6th of February this year is reporting a finding that might be interesting regarding my previous post.

The article says that researchers have found how rifts in nanocarbontubes disappear of themselves. It has been found because plasitics that nanocarbontubes are imbedded in can withstand higher mechnaical stresses.

According to simulations a phalanx is released when a rift appears. The phalanx is capable to move along the tube. It can kind of turn down the chemical bonds of the carbon atoms at the rift and "heal" the rift this way.

It is said that this needs to be tested by experiments that are thought to be difficult.

The article refers to a team around Boris Yakobson and Feng Ding (Rice-University, Houston) et al.: Physical Review Letters, Vol. 98, article 075503 ( http://link.aps.org/abstract/PRL/v98/e075503 ).

The finding is said to be interesting biologically - and it might be of interest for other threads of this section also.



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Post    Posted on: Thu Nov 01, 2007 11:52 am
There was an article a while ago reporting about improved airplane-materials - might it be of meaning for spacxeflight also? Might it reduce the requirement of capabilities like self-healing?

The article "New Material Could Revolutionize Aircraft Maintenance" ( www.space.com/businesstechnology/071012 ... ntrAl.html ) says that
Quote:
CentrAl provides some 25 percent more tensile strength than high-strength aluminum alloys, is extremely resistant to metal fatigue and is highly damage-tolerant, said Rinze Benedictus, chair of the Department of Aerospace Materials at Delft University of Technology.

At the same time, it is so light that a transport-aircraft wing made from a combination of CentrAl and aluminum -- which is better than CentrAl at resisting the compression strains on surfaces such as upper wingskins -- would not only be much stronger than a wing made from carbon-fiber composites, but also could be 20 percent lighter, said Benedictus.

"We think you can save 600 to 800 kilograms in a large aircraft (over carbon-fiber composite) -- we estimate that the saving could be around 15 to 20 percent of the weight of the wing,"


May be the information fits also into existing threads about composites or loight materials.

May be worth to read the entire article (which I did).



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Post    Posted on: Mon Jan 14, 2008 2:35 pm
Just this moment I wondered if such technologies might be tested in space by letting it orbit at altitudes where the chance to be hit by small space debris is highest or optimal at least. In particular I am thinking of the chinese satellite intentiously destroyed by an ASAT-rocket.

What about it?



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Post    Posted on: Tue Jan 15, 2008 1:32 pm
If they want to test it, they will do it on the ground. Space is just one of the environments where a self-repairing hull would come in handy. Plus, repairing is something different then selfconstructing, that satellite was shot to bits, not dented ;)


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Post    Posted on: Tue Jan 15, 2008 1:50 pm
Hello, Stefan,

regarding the satellite - of course you are correct. I thought of the debris resulting from the destruction as something that could impact the self-repairing hull to be tested...



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Post    Posted on: Thu Feb 21, 2008 12:08 pm
www.wissenschaft-online.de as well as www.welt.de are reporting today that a "Gummi" (German - rubber in principle) has been created that is capable of repairing itself. It is simply required to attach the two pieces to each other. Then molecules do the rest.

The material is synthesized based on lipide acids of plants.

The selfrepairing process lasts a few minutes only and works if the pieces are attached to each other or held together within one week.

It has been found by frensch Scientists and is reported in Nature 451: 977-980 (2008) ( www.nature.com/nature ).



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