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In-space consturction, building and assembly...

Posted by: Ekkehard Augustin - Thu Jun 15, 2006 10:25 am
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In-space consturction, building and assembly... 
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Post In-space consturction, building and assembly...   Posted on: Thu Jun 15, 2006 10:25 am
Some weeks ago U started to read Prof Komerath's NIAC-document about Tailored Force Fields.

The tema obviously has done real experiments about how to use static waves or more precisely the nodes of at least two static waves for moving objects. As far as I read the document up to now - page 15 - at least some of the experiments were done in pressurized environments.

So in-space construction could be done if simply there would be a station, dock, assembly yard orbiting Earth which is pressurized during construction or even repair of a vehicle or another object. When the vehicle etc. is ready the pressure could be removed, the station/dock/assembly yard opened and the vehicle could leave for space.

The work inside the pressurized assembly yard could be done by static sonic waves.

I have to go on reading Komerath's document but here some quotes:

Quote:
A unique set of experiments by our team had shown that by tailoring potential fields, large numbers of objects can be moved into desired positions and desired shapes can be constructed in reduced-gravity environments.


Quote:
While the formation of parts by acoustic shaping is feasible today, acoustic shaping requires containers with gas atmospheres.


Komerath explicitly considers the economical requirements of using electromagnetic waves. He hints to applications of ultrasonic waves alreday in use.



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Post    Posted on: Fri Jun 16, 2006 8:24 pm
That is interesting.


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Post    Posted on: Sat Jun 17, 2006 8:40 pm
As I've said before in another thread, I happen to know Dr. Komerath, and should be able to ask him some questions about his research if you would like. Just post the questions here, and I'll be happy to email them off to him. As it's summer, I don't know how fast he'll respond, but we can find out.

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Post    Posted on: Tue Jul 04, 2006 12:18 pm
Hello, spacecowboy,

to at first answer to you here too I of course will post questions here if I have some or I would send them to you via PM. I just have problems to have question without having read Prof. Komerath's document.

In between I have found another issue in that document about the application of acoustice waves. Prof. Komerath says
Quote:
7.9 Wall thickness and mode-switching

In the acoustic resonator, walls form single-particle thick. What happens when the nodal troughs are filled is not known. Ground experiments show the initiation of several smaller walls parallel to the primary nodal surfaces. If the walls formed reflect the waves in the field, the resonator switches to the next harmonic (that becomes the mode where losses are least). However, if the walls are transparent, then it should be possible to accumulate thicker walls. A more troubling possibility is that the particles may simply slide along the nodes and spill out at the edges of the resonator. Such behavior has been observed in the case of walls of water formed in an acoustic resonator at 1-G, where a fountain forms at the top of the water sheet which is formed (See Chapter 4). However it is not observed in the acoustic resonator with solid particles. Should this happen, then the appropriate course is to harden a coarse lattice of particles as soon as they reach the nodal plane, and allow subsequent particles to drift towards this lattice, and be heated so that they fuse with the lattice.
.

It seems that there are interesting experiences already that might be apllied or something based on.

Prof. Komerath prior to that also says that the Arecibo Radio-Telescope also has sent a signal that would be strong enough to form something via radio waves instead of acoustic waves - the wavelength also would be correct. The problem seems to be to form such a transmitter in space merely.



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EDIT: Komerath mentions an in-space experiment about all this also:

[quote]8.1 Developing Space Experiment Opportunities

Student teams working with the PI have been developing two experiments for flight opportunities on the Space Shuttle. The first is a “Student Experiment in Microgravityâ€


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Post    Posted on: Thu Jul 13, 2006 10:52 am
I haven't gone on yet to read Komerath's document - but I read an article today under www.wissenschaft.de that might fit into his thoughts also. Perhaps I 'll find it later when I go on reading his NIAC-study.

The article say that scientists have managed to get several atoms in one rwo plus to select one particular atom they could choose freely.

First the atoms have been cooled down to absoulte zero (nearly). Next - here the similarity starts the atoms have been placed into the low points of a static laser-wave. To select the atoms or to place them into a particular desired low point another static wave was used that was vertical to the first one.

This reminds me to Komerath. Of course - to cool down the atoms to absolute zero seems to be a very challenge in space (near Earth at least). But what has been done is similar to his concept.

The article refers to nature (doi:10.1038/442151a) www.nature.com .



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Post    Posted on: Thu Jul 13, 2006 6:21 pm
Interesting stuff.... Yes, it would seem that a laser would work in roughly the same manner as an acoustic resonator. Like I said, if you get any specific questions, let me know.

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Post    Posted on: Sat Nov 29, 2008 4:29 pm
The article already referred to in other threads - under www.wissenschaft.de this week - about driving a nano-scale resonator by the optical force of photons caused by the motion of an electromagnetic field - NOT by their radiation energy - might assist a better understanding here as well.

The article refers to Hong Tang, Yale-University in New Haven and his team as well as to Nature ( www.nature.com/ ), Online-Prepublication (DOI: 10.1038/nature07545).

Hello, spacecowboy, what about asking Komerath if this really is involved in his concept?

Of course the scientists didn't apply static waves etc. nor radio waves but photons. What let's me suppose that there might be a connection is the optical force and the electromagnetic field.

The result itself seems to be more interesting for driving nano-scale mechanical equipment or handling nano-scale parts, elements, particles that will be part of vehicles futurely. If they are to be handled in space this might be an additional way to make use of sunlight there - catching photons from it and controlling them for such purposes.



What about it?



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