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Could something be based on this new finding?

Posted by: Ekkehard Augustin - Fri Mar 11, 2005 1:12 pm
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Could something be based on this new finding? 
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Post Could something be based on this new finding?   Posted on: Fri Mar 11, 2005 1:12 pm
The Astrophysical Journal (vol. 620, nr. 2, p. 1027).( www.journals.uchicago.edu/ApJ/ ) has been quoted by www.wissenschaft.de that new research has been resulting in the insight that the material of the planet may have assembled by the assistnace of ice.

The article quoting says that dust cannot cluster together without ice or other frozen liquids or gases.The ice has to have very low temperature - below those temperatures that are to be found on Earth.

Ice in space at distances like that of Jupitor or the astroid belt at least perhaps might be have sufficiently low temperature.

It might be possible to collect that ice and to use it to cause clustering of dust. The clusters may be microscopic first but they would grow. This could be controlled perhaps. It may be a chance to let grow special shaped "rocks" or something like that.

What could you imagine? What technologies could be used to make such an idea work?
What technologies might be developed based on this finding?



Dipl.-Volkswirt (bdvb) Augustin (Political Economist)


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Post    Posted on: Fri Mar 11, 2005 2:23 pm
There is no more free icy dust in our solar system. The abstract says right at the start that, "There is limited time for the dust in the nebula around a newborn star to form planetesimals: in a few million years or less the star's stellar winds will disperse most of the unagglomerated dust." That is why the space community is talking about mining asteroids, comets and other small icy objects. Too bad for us that no known icy bodies are in near Earth orbits. At least I have not seen any data from NEAR or any other source saying that any has been found. However, Saturn has plenty of water ice. http://antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov/apod/ap050308.html


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Post    Posted on: Sat Mar 12, 2005 9:52 am
There is a lot of ice and dust out there in space - in the rings of Satrun and probably in the rings of Jupiter, Neptune and Uranus too there is a lot of ice. The surfaces of their monns often are covered by ice too. And there is a lot of dust between the planets Sometimes it's going into the earthian atmosphere and can be seeen in the night shortly after sunset.

And there is a scientific issue that Earth will be surrounded by more interplanetary and cosmic dust than normally for the next ten years because the solar magnetic ield is changing poles.

There is no clustering going on by nature - that's right but it might be possible to cause it artificially by new technologies to be searched for.

But the main application may be to use ice in the ISRU-based construction and building of habitats at Mars and mor distant moons as well as on asteroids - ice could be delivered from the saturnian rings to thos bodies.



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Post    Posted on: Fri Feb 20, 2009 6:42 pm
What about applying the finding to construct an Iglu-based space station?

Ice orbiting Saturn or another planet could be separated into brick-shaped pieces that could be mounted together. This also might involve dust.

The ice as well as the dust also would be a protection against particle radiation.

Perhaps a spacecraft could be formed as well this way.

If this works the radiation belts of the gas giants might be entered without danger for humans and without having to land an calliste to surround a spacecraft by callistian ice as Peter Kokh proposed.

What about it?



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