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Question regarding launch pads etc.

Posted by: Ekkehard Augustin - Fri Oct 21, 2005 2:26 pm
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Question regarding launch pads etc. 
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Post Question regarding launch pads etc.   Posted on: Fri Oct 21, 2005 2:26 pm
Are launch pads etc. constructed to be able to launch vehicles of different size and or weight? Is yes which way is that done?

Can launch pads etc. made scalable?



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Post    Posted on: Sat Oct 22, 2005 4:55 am
Generally, you're most worried about holding the vehicle up above the concrete pad (the the reflected exhaust doesn't damage the rocket itself), and not letting it crash through. Also, a cooling system is usually used (a water sprayer) to cool the concrete a bit. That's actually what generates the huge smoke clouds with the major space launches: steam coming from the active cooling.

But yeah, they're basically scalable; there's no inherent problems with that that I'm aware of.

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Post    Posted on: Wed Oct 26, 2005 5:06 pm
The Interorbital system of no launch pads is best. You only need build a simple, sturdy rocket.


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Post    Posted on: Thu Oct 27, 2005 2:22 am
Aren't there some ignition and reflection issues even there? Not to mention the fact that you need the thing to float.

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Post    Posted on: Thu Oct 27, 2005 5:15 am
The sea launch system uses a detachable counterwieght to erect the rocket when it arrivesw on site. The counter weight is simply filled with seawater dragging the stern/aft/flaming end underwater.

When it is let go at ignition the sudden return of bouyancy should cause the rocket to leap and cause cavitation, thus the rocket is already moving and the exhaust has something to fill and cool it. Thus reflections shouldn't be so bad.

Getting it to float is not as hard as stopping it from becoming an iceberg.

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Post    Posted on: Thu Oct 27, 2005 6:34 pm
Some detachable covering to split off should work, and the ice will come loose.

Beal wanted HTP and kerosene, room temp propellants. I wonder if that would work, provided you don't get that wrong piece of dirt in the HTP.


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Post    Posted on: Thu Oct 27, 2005 8:49 pm
Good points. Makes reasonable sense. I wonder how long it'd be reuseable, seeing as you'd not only have to make it heat-resistant, but saltwater-resistant as well.

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Post    Posted on: Thu Oct 27, 2005 10:01 pm
It was to be a pressure-fed. Musks water recovery of turbopumps is a bit harder. Once staged, I doubt we will see Musks first stages out of the water any more than we would any Delta.


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