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Please think about tools for less or zero gravity - space

Posted by: Ekkehard Augustin - Thu Mar 31, 2005 8:21 am
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Please think about tools for less or zero gravity - space 
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Post    Posted on: Thu Jun 22, 2006 9:16 pm
Personally, I still like the idea of the elastic-based suit. It's lightweight, nearly leak-proof, and easier to handle. Much more reliable than a waldo attached to the exterior of the suit.

And yes, hammers work perfectly well in space, just as they do here on Earth. I just would not recommend using one.

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Post    Posted on: Thu Jul 13, 2006 10:57 am
According to an article under www.wissenschaft.de it's possible in the nearby future to control a mouse-cursor or prosthesis via thoughts. In successful experiments this has been done via 96 electrodes in the head.

What about using this to simplify assembly work in space? Less EVAs might be needed and it wouldn't be that exhausting for astronauts to do work in space then.



Dipl.-Volkswirt (bdvb) Augustin (Political Economist)


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Post    Posted on: Fri Aug 04, 2006 3:09 pm
Quote:
ISS Expedition 13 flight engineers Jeffrey Williams and Thomas Reiter spent nearly six hours toiling outside the station while their commander – Russian cosmonaut Pavel Vinogradov – worked alone inside the orbital laboratory. They worked so fast that flight controllers at NASA’s Johnson Space Center (JSC) in Houston ran out of spacewalking tasks for them.


or

Quote:
They reentered the station’s Quest airlock five hours and 54 minutes later, or just over a half hour early.


or even

Quote:
photographed airlock scratches and themselves during their free time.


( "Spot On Spacewalk: Astronauts Ready ISS for Construction, Install Vital Sensor", www.space.com/missionlaunches/060803_ex ... ccess.html )

These quotes seem to indicate that it is possible to learn by doing how to work in space during am EVA, to learn from experiences and to make very good use of knowledge, ideas and the like.

I hope that their ways of working are documented and reported to the most elementary detail possible - simply to get a lot of data for

- instructions, how to work most efficiently during EVAs in construction(s)
- development of space-fit tools and
- improved education of astronauts.

...



Dipl.-Volkswirt (bdvb) Augustin (Political Economist)


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Post    Posted on: Tue Oct 31, 2006 11:51 am
Because I include the calculation of costs/prices in case of spherical tanks in the Financial Barriers-thread about a lunar flight here at least one idea I am thinking about regarding how a spherical tank might be built in space perhaps.

I don't know how tanks are built on Earth but I suspect that in space another object could be of use - this object would be kind of a negativen like in Photography. So I have in mind an inflatable sphere Bigelow Aeropsace could develop.

The spherical object would be inflated to serve as I relatively firm base around which layers of thin metals and other materials could be layed and combined to each other. This could be done segment by segment until the inflatable sphere is covered nearly completely.

One hole would be left through which the again deflated spherical object could leave the spherical tank.

Of course it may be that a second object is required out side the tank to have the possibility and opportunity to establish Earth-like pressure and temperature if these are required or of assistance and help. For such work Bigelow Inflatables may be sufficient also.

...



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Post    Posted on: Sun Nov 05, 2006 3:52 pm
To me it seems as if this also might remove the requirements of a few equipments.

For example the segmented layers don't need to be fixed within the transporting vehicle like satellites and tanks in use must be. The layers could be flexible and rolled on. This would enable the transportation of more segments.

Since the tank to be built in space wouldn't be transported in total the structures keeping fixed such a payload fall apart.

...



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Post    Posted on: Sun Aug 19, 2007 2:52 pm
The german Fraunhofer-Institut for Productiontechniques and Automation has developed a muscle mentions in another thread today already. It could be applied in outer skeletons already to provide additional forces for work requiring big forces. The user needs a small controller only and a battery or accumulator at his gurdle.

What about using it in or for a spacesuit? What it have be built in or could it be an option that could be attached if required?

Would it help during work on the ISS?



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Post    Posted on: Sat Dec 06, 2008 6:25 pm
May be, it was mentioned already -but what about mini-, micro- or nano-magbeams to move objects? Would the required amounts of energy be reasonable, controllable and available in orbit - can they be got as solar power and from the solar wind if the dock were outside the magnetic shield?

...



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