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SRB CEV Launcher

Posted by: bad_astra - Sun Mar 20, 2005 1:01 am
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SRB CEV Launcher 
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Post    Posted on: Thu Mar 24, 2005 1:58 pm
I am not so sure about either the structural limit or the human factors. Certainly Thiokol did not mention any structural problems when they looked at the problem and they should know if there would be any. And the acceleration would start pretty low and only build to 8Gs at the end of the 2 minutes that the SRB would burn. Fighter pilots routinely train at 7Gs and astronauts have endured much more than 8Gs in previous flights. (Shepard got to 11Gs on reentry I think).
What I think will prevent it being used is the lack of ability to throttle down in the max-Q area and the safety issue of people riding a rocket that can't be shut down in an emergency.


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Post    Posted on: Thu Mar 24, 2005 10:11 pm
SRB's are far from flimsy. In fact, they can kick over and fly depressed trajectories because of their strength. SRBs got a bad wrap with Challenger. A bad seal O-ring can doom any rocket. The fact that the two SRBs kept going after the blast proves how rugged they are. The steel casings impress me. Smaller solids are the ones more apt to actually explode--and scare me more--and CEV equipped medium EELVs must have them.

Delta IV must rise straight from the pad, and some abort profiles have 25 g loads--higher than for SRB in fact.

Delta IV was made as a Titan IV sat launcher--and it should stick with that--


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Post    Posted on: Thu Mar 24, 2005 11:35 pm
I did mention that I was talking about sane human beings, did I not?

7 or 8 Gees of acceleration are fine for test pilots, and are fine for a space transport company -- as long as your passenger market is made up entirely of test pilots, and your cargo manifests contain nothing more fragile than bulk lumber.

Come on, people! If you want to successfully commercialize space, you need to make it accessible to normal people, not just those who have trained half their lives for one bloody flight! Not to mention the market for more sensitive equipment than can currently be sent up because it will (as of now) be smashed to gold powder and silicon dust by the acceleration undergone during launch.

We've only got two hundred and fifty miles to go; surely we can get there without having to use 8gs the whole way!

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Post    Posted on: Fri Mar 25, 2005 1:58 am
We are talking about the CEV and not commercial space. Nobody like me will ever ride in the CEV, only professional astronauts will. And 8Gs is not that extreme. Space Ship One gets above 5Gs on reentry and the SRB CEV launcher would be below that for most of it's flight. With minor changes it could even be an easier ride than the Saturn V was. One less segment would reduce the thrust significantly, especially considering the heavier upper stage it would have to carry. I do agree that such a system would not make a good space tourist vehicle though.


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Post    Posted on: Fri Apr 15, 2005 5:04 pm
SRB's are man-rated--are rugged--and can have smaller solid upper stages on those.

I would like to see two types of automated interplanetary probes. An HLLV launched Europa ice misson to drop a cryo-bot to explore smokers (no Delta II sounding rocket will cut it), and an SRB with other solids perched on it. This would be a fast interplanetary probe with the fuel/payload ration even more exaggerated in favor of the rocket fuel. This would be good to track transient evens like newly found asteroids quite close. One such solid left on the pad--just in case--or perhaps just an MX in a silo--would be perfect.


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