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CO2-removing technology

Posted by: Ekkehard Augustin - Mon Mar 14, 2005 12:41 pm
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CO2-removing technology 
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Post    Posted on: Fri Mar 18, 2005 6:02 pm
This is not shaping up to be a trip filled with gastronomic delights is it?

Bowl of ants with an Algae side salad anyone? :)

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Post    Posted on: Fri Mar 18, 2005 6:18 pm
I am not sure about it but I vague remeber that I have read that some Japanes or Chinese created a meal of algae or insetcs tasting well or interesting. It was of insider-kind when it was in the gourmet part of a newspaper.

I might be in error concerning that but if the creation of meal out of ants, other insects, algae or plankton or something like that would be left to the Chinese, Japanese, Korean or other Aseans the result will be something tatsing good - or reasonale at least. I am sure about it - as far as I know the variety of good tasting or gourmet-like creation of meals isn't exhausted yet by far. Pemanently new meals are created. It's art like painting pictures, hammering or constructing sculptures or componing music.

Let they invent good tasting ant. and algae-meals.



Dipl.-Volkswirt (bdvb9 Augustin (Political Economist)


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Post    Posted on: Sat Oct 04, 2008 6:55 pm
In the edition of Wirtschaftswoche of 29th of September there was a very interesting short article.

It is reporting that Torsten Sulz head of development of the company egm in Papenburg/Germany has found that in a Cyclone-like apparatus CO2 might be cracked into oxygen and carbon.

In the lab this indeed worked according to Dirk Freese of the faculty of soil protection and reculturing at the Brandenburgian Technical University in Cottbus/Germany.

The CO2 reacts with waer that falls into the tornado inside the Cyclone-like apparatus. The major portion of the carbon remains solved in the water while small amounts of hydrocarbons are created.

The scientists in Cottbus have proved by a biological method that there really is carbon in that water.

So this may be a new method to handle the CO2 aboard space vehicles, on Venus or on Mars.



What about it?



Dipl.-Volkswirt (bdvb) Augustin (Political Economist)


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