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Martian sea, colonists and a friendly martian home...

Posted by: Ekkehard Augustin - Fri Mar 04, 2005 6:25 pm
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Martian sea, colonists and a friendly martian home... 
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Post    Posted on: Wed Nov 02, 2005 11:24 am
If you could make a suitable concrete and insulating foam from Moon or Mars regolith you could almost use the standard way of producing a monolithic concrete dome employed on Earth. Check out the attached link.

http://www.monolithicdome.com

The site has a large number of different floor plans to choose from and some cool pictures of domes already built, it even has an eveluator program where you can put your preferences in and it gives you a cost for building it. I hadn't realised that dome building had progressed so far.

http://www.monolithic.com/plan_design/house_plans/

Tried to convince the wife that moving into a dome would be a good idea but she said she wasn't going to live in a teletubbies house. :)

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Post    Posted on: Wed Nov 02, 2005 5:15 pm
Actually, once you get some fully-automated gadgets up there, you might consider doming over entire craters with glass. If I remember correctly, commercial cookware glass (the black stuff) does reasonably well.

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Post    Posted on: Wed Nov 02, 2005 5:32 pm
It's not linked to the posts to this thread of this day and I stil have to read the links Andy Hill has listed. But perhaps I now should say here that the thread about this topic which I initiated in the forum under www.marssociety.de has had 183 views up to day - that's alot relative to the daily views ussually occuring at threads of that forum.

Does anyone know if the american section of the Mars Society is involved into th dome thoughts or if they are informed about what is discussed in their german forum and section? Do they take over suggestions and proposals directly or is that organized a "bureaucratical" way?



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Post    Posted on: Thu Nov 03, 2005 4:06 am
No clue -- there's a chapter of the MS here at Tech, but I haven't been able to make it to a meeting yet (it's right in the middle of my scheduled work period).

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Post    Posted on: Thu Dec 01, 2005 11:36 am
There might be an alternative to the large sea - the article "Buried craters and underground ice - Mars Express uncovers depths of Mars" ( www.spacefellowship.com/News/?p=1275#more-1275 ) seems to be speaking abou the same thing as an article under www.marssociety.de does:

Quote:
First results reveal an almost circular structure, about 250 km in diameter, shallowly buried under the surface of the northern lowlands of the Chryse Planitia region in the mid-latitudes on Mars. The scientists have interpreted it as a buried basin of impact origin, possibly containing a thick layer of water-ice-rich material.


Quote:
Two strong and distinct echoes coming from the area correspond to a surface reflection and subsurface interface between two different materials. By analysis of the two echoes, the scientists were able to draw the likely scenario of a nearly pure, cold water-ice layer thicker than 1 km, overlying a deeper layer of basaltic regolith. This conclusion appears to rule out the hypothesis of a melt zone at the base of the northern layered deposits.


The article under www.marssociety.de says that close to the equator an impact crater has been detetced which is buried by dirty ice and is more than 200 kilometers wide. They are referring to Michael Khan, ESCOC, Darnstadt.

Would you prefer these to the large sea? I personally don't know. Would it be easier compared to the large sea to settle there, to establish a Mars staion or a colony? ...



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EDIT: Just read:

Quote:
The low frequency radar instrument also revealed a buried crater basin in the northern Chryse Planitia lowlands. Although the giant crater is nearly 250 kilometers in diameter, it is shallowly buried and invisible on the planet’s surface. Additional MARSIS radar probes have shown a 1-kilometer-thick deposit of material in the basin that has the characteristics of ice, suggesting that water once flowed into the crater.



"Mars Studies Find Buried Crater and Signs of Past Water" ( www.space.com/scienceastronomy/051130_mars_update.html )


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Post    Posted on: Thu Dec 01, 2005 7:20 pm
Andy Hill wrote:
If you could make a suitable concrete and insulating foam from Moon or Mars regolith you could almost use the standard way of producing a monolithic concrete dome employed on Earth. Check out the attached link.

http://www.monolithicdome.com

The site has a large number of different floor plans to choose from and some cool pictures of domes already built, it even has an eveluator program where you can put your preferences in and it gives you a cost for building it. I hadn't realised that dome building had progressed so far.

http://www.monolithic.com/plan_design/house_plans/

Tried to convince the wife that moving into a dome would be a good idea but she said she wasn't going to live in a teletubbies house. :)


This technology should help as well. With the cranes available from www.shuttlelift.com that I describe at the heavy lift site, we could have good sized infrastructure for X-prize folks here, with something similar on the moon:

http://spacefellowship.com/Forum/viewto ... 7777#17777


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Post    Posted on: Fri Jan 20, 2006 1:10 pm
After reading the article "Snow on Mars Created Glaciers Near Equator" ( www.space.com/scienceastronomy/060119_mars_snow.html ) it seems to me that the number of locations where settlers, colonists or even the crew of a martian station could live within and protected against radiation and particles by ice is growing - simply since it seems as fi there may be several glaciers.

To create a habitat in a glacier might be much easier than to do that in a martian sea because a glacier can be supposed to be accessable from the side instead of having to go down first and to do that into the soil first perhaps. ...

What do you think?



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Post    Posted on: Sat Nov 03, 2007 4:14 pm
According to an article under www.wissenschaft.de a similar amount of ice seems to be located at the martian equator as at the south pole.

The ice sea reported about much earlier also was in the equatorial region rather than in a polar region.

The newly found ice seems to be under a chain of mountaines - these would mean protection against the solar wind and cosmic radiation.

If the finding is confirmed later then a cahin of settlements buried beneath the ice might be possible - with access to very much sunlight for solar power.

It is alternatively possible that the radar has found sediments of dust of untipical low density but this is considered to be unlikely.

The article refers to Thomas Watters of the Smithsonian-Institution, Washington and Science, Online-prepublication, doi: 10.1126/science.1148112 ( www.sciencemag.org/ )



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Post    Posted on: Tue Nov 13, 2007 11:53 am
In between the article "Odd Martian Terrain Examined" ( www.space.com/scienceastronomy/071108-m ... s-mff.html ) is reporting about it as well.

Obviously this article is doubting a bit more about but also says in detail that the electric properties resemble thos of water ice. But it also says that the ice must be buried in a depth of several meters to not have evaporated.

On the other hand there is the ice sea reported about MNars Express is assumed to have detected.

It would be interesting perhaps if the dust and soil can provide the pressure required.

Under the aspect of the subject of this thread the existence of ice deposits that don't form a real ice layer could artficially turned into such a layer and then be used to extend and link existing ice seas like the one Mars Express detected.



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Post    Posted on: Tue Jun 24, 2008 2:26 pm
The way water has been found on Mars reported by the article "Proof! Water Ice Found on Mars" ( www.space.com/scienceastronomy/080620-p ... pdate.html ) shows up the problem that one will be faced to if the ice sea or any other such sea on Mars wouldn't be covered by something.

At present it seems to be dust what keeps the sea from disappearing - if the sea would be used for an submarine colony a better protection would be required.

Of course it would take a long time until it would be vaporized but it should never be vaporized in order to sustain a colony for centuries and millenia.



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Post    Posted on: Sat Dec 20, 2008 2:46 pm
Under the aspect of colonies within or below ice the article "Buried Glaciers Found on Mars" ( www.space.com/scienceastronomy/081120-m ... ciers.html ) might be interesting also.

This would mean to live in a glacier - which could be experimented an tested easyly on Earth.

But the glacier would have to be secured very well - may be maintenance is required.

The article doesn't tell the amount of water of the glaciers nor if they are linked or connected somehow. So caution requires to suppose that a colonie within the glacier(s) needs to be much smaller than that within the ice sea - unless artificial connections can be constructed...


What about it?



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