Community > Forum > Wirefly X Prize Cup > Who plans on going to the first x-cup?

Who plans on going to the first x-cup?

Posted by: TerraMrs - Fri May 21, 2004 9:59 pm
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Who plans on going to the first x-cup? 

Are you going to go to the first x-cup?
Of course. 23%  23%  [ 7 ]
If I have the money. 67%  67%  [ 20 ]
Haven't decided. 7%  7%  [ 2 ]
No. 0%  0%  [ 0 ]
All those rockets.... sounds dangerous. 3%  3%  [ 1 ]
Total votes : 30

Who plans on going to the first x-cup? 
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Post    Posted on: Tue Aug 24, 2004 4:22 pm
The topic seems to be a little bit tricky.

During the XPRIZE competition the teams may launch whever they want. As I remeber the website of Stachaser they are planning to launch from Great Britain. They have pictures of launches at their site. Are they forced to move their launch site in between by the government or so?

Further your explanation seems to say that the first stages didn't leave the atmosphere and they were part of weapons. They were not reusable and didn't have parachutes or the like. So the comparison has it' problems.

If the reusability measures are insufficient concerning densely populated regions - what can be done to achieve further reductions of landing velocity and aiming exactly at special landing sites.



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Post    Posted on: Wed Aug 25, 2004 8:45 am
It was not a weapon system that was planned to launch in GB but the old Black Arrow launch vehicle. Only the 3rd stage would achieve orbit. Even though Starchaser INTEND for the first stage to come down nicely under a parachute, HM Government are understandably not keen on it doing this over, well, anything that might survive to go to court. As for guiding parts to specific landing sites, it just can't be done 100% of the time. I know this is unfair as aircraft don't land on the conveniently provided runways 100% of the time, but thats life.

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Post    Posted on: Wed Aug 25, 2004 9:14 am
What was the Black Arrow in detail? I can't remember having heard of it this moment.

I didn't think that the second stage had been designed for achieving the orbit but for leaving the atmosphere to be burned at reentry because of non-reusability and everything on the surface to be relatively safe for this reason - I obviously have been wrong. But it's not a good idea of the constructors to let a non-resusable stage reach the surface on land but on sea.

This reminds me to special possible locations for british spaceports - the sea around the island and the sea around the remaining british "colonies" like the Falklands. Somewhere within the 200-mile-zones on old oil-platforms similar to Sea Launch. ...

What about this?



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Post    Posted on: Wed Aug 25, 2004 10:52 am
http://homepage.powerup.com.au/~woomera/bkarrow.htm
http://www.spaceuk.org/ba/ba.htm

Just a brief snippet on the black arrow.

http://www.spaceuk.org/ba/northsea.htm

Bit about potential launch sites.

http://www.spaceuk.org/bk/hd/highdown2.htm

This shows the old Saunders Roe facility on the Isle of Wight.

It would seem that the second stage was intended to land close to the North pole during the launch of a Black Arrow. Interestingly, the programme does entirely validate Mr Carmack's approach to acheiving orbit in the future. A launch site in the Falkland Islands would be hampered in the same way as South Uist, lack of infrastructure and bitter cold. After a brief check on thr Foreign and Commonwealth Office website, it would seem that Bermuda is still part of Britain. Not a bad site if the equipment could be got there. Hope this helps.

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Post    Posted on: Wed Aug 25, 2004 11:11 am
To avoid misunderstandings - I don't intend to opone to yiour arguments and I didn't. I'm thinking and searching for possible solutions only and to look if they might survive discussions.

Concerning air traffic there are multiple categories of airports - the highest category is fit to international economy class passenger flights but the lowest only to short distance private "fun" flights. Similarly there might be several categories of spaceports be imagined - some fit for nearly all launch concepts, others fit for launches from sea only, again others fit for airplane-like launches only etc.

But this will be become interesting only when there will have been successful launches by these concepts I think.

Besides - getting old oil-platforms from BP, Esso etc. may be a good kind of funding perhaps. Only condition might be to pay more for them than the firms get from museums etc. ...



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