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Bigelow Gets O.K. from Government.

Posted by: DJBREIT - Wed Nov 24, 2004 5:42 pm
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Bigelow Gets O.K. from Government. 
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Post Bigelow Gets O.K. from Government.   Posted on: Wed Nov 24, 2004 5:42 pm
Bigelow Space Module Flight Gets Government Okay.
This has clear one of the more annoying hurdles to space. :)
Read on.Space news


Last edited by DJBREIT on Fri Nov 26, 2004 5:48 pm, edited 1 time in total.



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Post    Posted on: Wed Nov 24, 2004 7:28 pm
One of the smallest hurtles i may add. Sure thing it's annoying, but i the biggest hurtle will allways be how much it will cost to lift off.

Maybe they should also somehow re-manage all these little hurtles along the way since they will cost valuable time on an allready pretty long time-scale. If they would work together on smoothening the rules, it will be a lot easier from now on. Benefit to all.

If i would launch a rocket in Europe, would i need to comply with the rules of the FAA or is it purely an US organization?


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Post    Posted on: Wed Nov 24, 2004 10:05 pm
Stefan wrote:
If i would launch a rocket in Europe, would i need to comply with the rules of the FAA or is it purely an US organization?


The FAA is purely a US Organization, only if you launch in the US you have to ask them for permission.
I have the impression that they don't even need this permittion, it's more sort of a recommendation letter. I think they applied for it as a precaution. If Spacex applies for the launch application it can make things speed up, and if the FAA has doubts because this is a new sort of payload (not your typical communications satellite), they can show them this letter.
And it's probably also a good thing that the FAA allready knows of theirs plans, so they are prepared when Bigelow starts taking guests to his space hotel.


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Post    Posted on: Thu Nov 25, 2004 1:01 am
Stefan wrote:
One of the smallest hurdles I may add. Sure thing it's annoying, but I the biggest hurtle will always be how much it will cost to lift off.

I said the more annoying hurdles. Since bureaucracy can stop any well funded project dead in its tracks.

Stefan wrote:
Maybe they should also somehow re-manage all these little hurdles along the way since they will cost valuable time on an already pretty long time-scale. If they would work together on smoothening the rules, it will be a lot easier from now on. Benefit to all.

This is the first time the FAA-AST is giving ( to my knowledge) “favorable payload determination” license application for a Module space habitat instead of a satellite . They probable needed to make a set of new rules to cover the new type of space structure. See “Extensive review” in the article.

Soyuz is right you don’t need it out side the US. You do need it to launch in the US. It would be an advantage if a team has a certified by the FAA-AST since the FAA is the gold standard for the aeronautical industry (A FAA certified air craft can land at any air port in the world “except where the locals use them as target prates”). And will probably be at the for front of the civilian manned-space industry. But you will have to see what rules Europe will be using. In the mean time Europe will problem except the FAA certifications until they set up there own regulations and certifications.
fix


Last edited by DJBREIT on Fri Nov 26, 2004 5:47 pm, edited 1 time in total.



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Post    Posted on: Thu Nov 25, 2004 8:32 am
I thought that if you were a US citizen it didn't matter where in the world you were launching from you still had to abide by US regulations. So Bigelow would still be subject to them rules ... no?

By the way ... are you guys talking about turtles or hurdles ... :?

DKH

(I once believed that if a turtle was small it was the least annoying turtle in the pond ... but no more! Now the smallest of turtles shall feel my wrath and I will crush them into littler turtles still.)

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Post    Posted on: Thu Nov 25, 2004 9:29 am
I remeber a thread under "Regulation of space travel" in which there is a post too saying that a US citizen were to live and act as US laws tell him - and I still can't understand or believe that.

Wherever a US citizen is on this planet he has to obey to the laws of that country - he mustn't hurt these laws no way. If there is a conflict between the laws of that country and the US laws the law of that other country is to obeyed instead of to be hurt by obeying US law.

If there really is such a rule then itcan be valid only in those cases in which the US law as well as the law of the other country are similar and

a) the US law is more restrictive than the other country's law if both laws intend to prevent crime,
b) the US law is more restrictive than the other country's law if both laws intend to protect someone or something,
c) the US law is allowing less than the other country's law if both laws intend to allow something.

May be the list is incomplete but if an US law doesn't fulfill a), b) or c) at least the US citizen has to obey to the other country's law because of that country's sovereignty.

And is there any chance for the US to punish an US citizen for not obeying US law while being in another country without observing the citizen?

This applies to US regulations concerning launches as well. I cannot imagine that the US tells their citizens to hurt the other country's laws or regulations and I cannot imagine thta the US observes or spies their citozens while being in another countries eccept they are soldiers or diplomates.



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Post    Posted on: Fri Nov 26, 2004 8:06 pm
Ekkehard Augustin wrote:
I remeber a thread under "Regulation of space travel" in which there is a post too saying that a US citizen were to live and act as US laws tell him - and I still can't understand or believe that.Dipl.-Volkswirt (bdvb) Augustin (Political Economist)


Some laws like laws pertaining to pedophilia, statutory rape, kidnapping, drug trafficking, terrorist association and some other criminal activities. But they do need to get there hands on them before the U.S. can prosecute them. The U.S. dose not investigations there citizen unless some thing gets the attention (it is just not cost-effective to investigations everyone). It is only when something they do gets there attention like complaints from the country, a citizen of that country. A U.S. citizen, media or an association with known criminals or criminals organization’s that the U.S. is investigating.

A US citizens can set up a space ship company in any other county and they only need to obeying that country law to launch the ship. It is only when you deal with the U.S. when you will need to obey FAA reg’s.

Most modern county use the FAA reg’s as the standard because why put the money into re-inventing the wheel when some one else has an establish organization that already cover this.


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Post    Posted on: Sat Nov 27, 2004 8:16 am
Interesting, but ugh. I was wondering if there were language barrier issues, but I saw you were from the US - it was very hard to read. Yes, the FAA is often used as a reference for other international standards organizations - yet most first-world nations have their own standards organizations. What is your area of experience in dealing with developing technologies or products in other counteries? Do you have some insight into US policy with dealing with ex-patriots?


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