Community > Forum > The Spaceflight Cafe > Safe interplanetary flight routes...(?)

Safe interplanetary flight routes...(?)

Posted by: Ekkehard Augustin - Thu Aug 24, 2006 11:30 am
Post new topic Reply to topic
 [ 4 posts ] 
Safe interplanetary flight routes...(?) 
Author Message
Moderator
Moderator
avatar
Joined: Thu Jun 03, 2004 11:23 am
Posts: 3745
Location: Hamburg, Germany
Post Safe interplanetary flight routes...(?)   Posted on: Thu Aug 24, 2006 11:30 am
The article "40-Year-Old Mars Meteor Mystery Said Solved" ( www.space.com/scienceastronomy/060823_mars_mystery.html ) tells that it is supposed that the debris of comet D/1895 Q1 (Swift) damaged Mariner 4 a bit in the mid-sixties of the last century.

That probe randomly may have been very close to that former comet.

It reminds a bit to rock fall that can occur in the Alpes - there are traffic signs ammouncing that rock fall might happen.

So this would have to be an element in designing space traffic lines of least dangers.

...



Dipl.-Volkswirt (bdvb) Augustin (Political Economist)


Back to top
Profile
Space Station Member
Space Station Member
User avatar
Joined: Wed Nov 10, 2004 6:12 am
Posts: 321
Location: Melbourne, Australia
Post    Posted on: Mon Aug 28, 2006 4:04 am
Except for things like Saturn's rings and the Van Allen radiation belts, most space dangers don't stay in one place. (Ok, technically neither do they, except in a local frame of reference :wink: )

Your best bet is to feed your proposed trajectory into a computer and have it tell you if anything else will be in roughly the same place at the same time. Very small alterations in trajectory are usually enough to avoid dangers by a wide margin.


Back to top
Profile
Spaceflight Participant
Spaceflight Participant
avatar
Joined: Mon Mar 20, 2006 4:16 pm
Posts: 51
Location: Albuquerque
Post space debris   Posted on: Tue Aug 29, 2006 5:03 pm
Of course, in deep space, good luck spotting meteorids ahead of time.

Best bet is to avoid passing through known comet "paths".

Most people still operate on the "space is big" theory of collision avoidance. That works for the most part in deep space, but in LEO debris is getting ugly.

Of course that is a topic for another thread.

- Alistair

_________________
Mach 25 Begins With Safety


Back to top
Profile
Moderator
Moderator
avatar
Joined: Thu Jun 03, 2004 11:23 am
Posts: 3745
Location: Hamburg, Germany
Post    Posted on: Fri Sep 01, 2006 1:39 pm
What about looking for paths along which debris is flying that is left from comets died before astronomical observation by telescopes was started? Satellites orbiting the sun searching for them for example?



Dipl.-Volkswirt (bdvb) Augustin (Political Economist)


Back to top
Profile
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 4 posts ] 
 

Who is online 

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 16 guests


© 2014 The International Space Fellowship, developed by Gabitasoft Interactive. All Rights Reserved.  Privacy Policy | Terms of Use