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Oxygen Generation from plants

Posted by: Stefan Sigwarth - Mon Jul 10, 2006 5:29 pm
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Oxygen Generation from plants 
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Post Oxygen Generation from plants   Posted on: Mon Jul 10, 2006 5:29 pm
Hey guys,

because of any lengthy mission to the moon, mars (and imo iss) and beyond, we cannot continue carrying food over and over again. Nor can we do that with oxygen. We all know that nasa is experimenting with plants to take the co2 from the air and replenish the oxygen. Allthough iév searched for some time, i can't find any data on what plants generate the most oxygen in the least amount of time. That, and that data for plants that also can be used as a food source.

Does anybody know this kind of data publicly exists? Like a table with hundreds of plants species where the oxygen generation was/is measured?


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Post    Posted on: Mon Jul 10, 2006 5:32 pm
I have heard that algae is the best producer of oxygen.


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Post Chlorella algae is the winner!   Posted on: Tue Jul 11, 2006 1:57 am
The algae “Chlorellaâ€


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Post    Posted on: Tue Jul 11, 2006 7:14 am
Food, algae, oxygen - this often makes me think about the ecologic connections, links and system nearly without esacpe.

The reason is that down here on Earth food is got by or from the ecologic system.

So it again and again seems to me that some way the problem of the requirement of food and oxygen neccesaryly should be kept to be a part of the ecological system.

In principle the lengthy missions are temporary extensions of the earthian ecologic system to other planets - Stefan, you in principle mentioned Moon, Mars and ISS. The extensions are done as temporary separations of segments out of the ecologic system. In the Technology section I already inititiated a thread about that in 2004 or 2005.

So perhaps data might be found in publications about Ecologics or the earthian ecology or about Terraforming - did you already try there, Stefan?

May be that the alien environment can be made a temporary part of the earthian ecology by temporary placing the temporary separated segment there. If "temporary" is turned into "permanent" the earthian ecologic system will have been made part of a multi-planetary ecologic system with plants adjusted to the alien environments. This makes me think about a german article reporting about a plant created genetically by NASA - the plant emits light if there is emergency or danger (shortage of oxygen if I remeber correct). Is that one of the informations you are mentioning, Stefan?



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Post    Posted on: Tue Jul 11, 2006 7:50 am
Thank you al for your inputs.

@Ekkehard, i only searched with keywords like 'oxygen generation' and 'oxygen plants'. Haven't searched for 'Terraforming' yet, good point. From the genetically engineered plant you mentioned, well, that's sort of what i meant, but i had specificly oxygen generation in mind.

About the ecologic system, we should be able to create a closed system in a base or orbiting station. The hardest problem will be to replenish water. Apart from water, the rest should be relatively easy. Just make enough food and make sure that you create more oxygen that the residents of the habitat consume, and you have a very efficient closed 'eco'-system. If we can also recycle/re-use at least 50% of the water, you would only need a shipment of water once in a while.

I will look op that topic you mentioned, Ekkehard. Thanks.

/edit/
Ths topic perhaps: http://www.spacefellowship.com/Forum/vi ... en&start=0

/edit2/
Found some more usefull stuff. From wiki:

Code:
Reacting hydrogen with the carbon dioxide atmosphere via the Sabatier reaction would yield methane and water. The Sabatier process involves the reaction of hydrogen with carbon dioxide at elevated temperatures and pressures in the presence of a nickel catalyst to produce methane and water. Optionally ruthenium on alumina makes a more efficient catalyst. It is described by the following reaction:
CO2 + 4H2 → CH4 + 2H2O

It has been proposed as a key step in enabling the manned exploration of Mars (Mars Direct) by taking hydrogen transported from earth and carbon dioxide taken from the atmosphere of Mars to produce methane that can be used as a rocket propellant. This would result in a very considerable savings of weight which would have to be transported to Mars.


With link for additional information: http://www.isso.uh.edu/publications/A99 ... rich84.pdf

I am not a person with enough knowledge of this, but it sounds to me that the Mars Direct plan isn't really so 'direct'.

/edit3/
Very interesting. Green noodles: http://www.spirulinasource.com/earthfoodch9a.html

/edit4/
Some more information on spirulina: http://www.australianspirulina.com.au/d ... rulina.pdf


Last edited by Stefan Sigwarth on Tue Jul 11, 2006 9:09 am, edited 2 times in total.



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Post    Posted on: Tue Jul 11, 2006 8:25 am
Only to add it - there is another aspect I wanted to mention but forgot. And I really want to mention it only but not discuss it here since it tendentially is off-topic to this thread.

The aspect is that I assist the argument regarding carrying food. As long as only food is carried into space or to another planet such transporationts should be avoided if possible any way. But taking the manned vehicle or mission as temporary removed segment of the earthian ecology and placed into an alien environment might result in the detection of a possibility that the earthian ecology and environement might get something postive back fro the food carried. In that case there would be a critical point beyond which to carry the food has a positive return that could fund vehicles and missions.

But please - that's an aspect only that's off-topic here. And in between I also had more ideas regarding cultivating palnts in the martian environment already - which are off-topic here too. Perhaps I will post them in one or more Technology section-threads that consider Terraforming.



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Post Re: Chlorella algae is the winner!   Posted on: Wed Jul 12, 2006 1:31 am
rpspeck wrote:
Note that Chlorella is most efficient at light levels below direct sunlight
Sounds perfect for Mars, doesn't it?


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Post    Posted on: Thu Aug 24, 2006 2:13 am
Stefan Sigwarth wrote:
About the ecologic system, we should be able to create a closed system in a base or orbiting station. The hardest problem will be to replenish water. Apart from water, the rest should be relatively easy. Just make enough food and make sure that you create more oxygen that the residents of the habitat consume, and you have a very efficient closed 'eco'-system. If we can also recycle/re-use at least 50% of the water, you would only need a shipment of water once in a while.


There is no reason to expect recycling of water to be difficult or inefficient. "Vacuum Distillation" (to turn water into vapor and condense the pure water again) really isn't difficult in space. (Just stop reading NASA plans, and pay attention to chemical and ecological processes.) Water is always being recycled! The energy cost even with lots of bathing (and zero G swimming?) is still a fraction of the O2 generation energy (and can use waste heat from the solar input to your plants).

Some water loss is possible, but really should be below 1% with a fair system. (10 grams per day per person with a good system).


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